1971 Hofner?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Noot, Dec 18, 2013.


  1. Noot

    Noot

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    Hey guys,

    Somebody is selling locally a 1971 Hofner solid bass. It's missing one bridge drum and a tuning peg ring. He's asking for 360$. Is it worth it? Would it be a player or just a collectable?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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    Hi.

    I can't say I've seen one with that body style, and a quick search didn't reveal anything either.

    The bridge cover and the control panel (except for the switches) look like the ones in the 190, the neck looks like the one in the 182.

    The price is about right IMO if it's indeed a Hofner, but not a collectible in any way.
    Only the beatle bass is, and even that one only because that was the only one McCartney was able to afford that could easily be played LH.

    The 182 I have is a nice cheap vintage instrument, but nothing special.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  3. HaphAsSard

    HaphAsSard

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    Just FYI - I remembered seeing one for sale here.
    (No idea if it's worth the asking price, or whatever criteria determine if it is.)
    http://www.mercatinomusicale.com/mm/a_basso-hofner-modello-telecaster_id3027722.html


    Oh, yeah, and here's some more pics, of one in the UK
    http://www.vintagehofner.co.uk/hofner/basses/bas19.html

    and the one you're considering buying, it seems:
    http://www.vintagehofner.co.uk/vintage-hofner/bass/bas11.html


    Designation "Model 186", apparently. "[P]roduced between 1971 and 1973."


    [EDIT - One month later, I guess I can throw in a couple keywords for this thread to come up on searches, since the most striking characteristic of the bass hasn't been mentioned, surprisingly:
    Telecaster guitar shaped/shape/style, Tele, Esquire. What the hell: Broadcaster, Nocaster, No-Caster too! Oh, and Fender (useful if used in combination with the above) and Höfner and Hofner (and Hoefner, Höffner, Hoffner, Hoeffner for the spellingly challenged).
    There. :cool: ]
     
  4. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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  6. Bass Fund

    Bass Fund Banned

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    I saw the same Hofner at a music shop when I was about 16 years old, with my highschool band. Love this website.
     
  7. Noot

    Noot

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    Is it short or long scale?
    I couldn't dare ask for a sound sample ..
    Here is a real pic.
     

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  8. Noot

    Noot

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    There also seems to be someting fishy with the backplate.
     

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  9. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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    Hi.

    I do not know for sure, but most of the solid body Höfners were short scale.



    I'd say the nibbled neck plate is the least of Your worries though ;).

    The lack of strings OTOH would worry me quite a bit. These instruments aren't known for being the prime examples of great engineering nor for being examples of high manufacturing standards either, so more likely than not, the TR isn't functioning properly.
    Short scale flats aren't very cheap either.

    The PU's break pretty easily as well, so those should always be tested when buying a vintage Höfner.

    One of the appeals of Höfners like 182, is that they're real European vintage instruments, but mostly because they share the same PU's and control plates with the 500's.
    At least the 60's ones do.

    If shopping wisely, one can sell the original parts of a 182 for example and upgrade them with more player friendly parts and still pocket some change.

    Not quite so with that 186 there.

    I would pass on that, low-balling is something I loathe, being on either side of the deal.
    IMO in order to make something out of that deal, You'd have to low-ball pretty deeply.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  10. Bass Fund

    Bass Fund Banned

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    I'm still trippin' at the sight of this Hofner bass. I remember Rod the saleman saying, "It's $189., but it's missing a few frets. Wait, no it's not."-1991

    I really wanted that bass.
     
  11. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion Gold Supporting Member

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    I personally would grab it it's an unusual Höfner model and it's collectible the Beatle basses while still sought after are a dime a dozen and can be found anywhere if everything works and you can grab it for $300 or less I say go for it I guarantee it will be worth more than a $300 Fender in a few years. I also disagree about the quality of Höfners from any era your talking about instruments that weren't produced in large numbers like a Fender.
     
  12. garya

    garya

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    Hmm, that is not the story I always heard about Paul and his Hofner. What I heard was that Hofner approached Paul and gave him that bass. I am not sure if it was just to tryout or he bought it. The story also went that they designed it with him in mind because he was left handed. I am close to the age of the Beatles, but I wasn't there or know any of the Beatles personally, so I can't say for sure. But I never heard your version before. I could also be wrong. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2014

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