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2014 Formula 1 Rule Changes

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by metalhead398, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. metalhead398

    metalhead398

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    http://www.formula1.com/news/features/2013/8/14875.html

    For all you F1 fans out there:
    How do you feel about the rule changes? The smaller but turbo'ed engine, ERS, lowered nose, less fuel? Happy or sad? Angry?

    I myself would love to see the engines get much larger, more like the old days. I really like the nose thing though, will be more like early 2000's, with the downwards curves. But hey, this ain't about me! Share your thoughts!
  2. Passinwind

    Passinwind Charlie Escher Supporting Member

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    For me, in many ways the golden years were the 1.5L turbo cars from the mid-80s, and then the late 60s-early 70s ones. Which old days were you referring to?
  3. metalhead398

    metalhead398

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    Right about then, maybe a little later. Probably between Niki Lauda and Ayrton's death. 1500 bhp and no mechanical grip made those days way more exciting... Not of course in the crash sense, just skill level.
  4. dmusic148

    dmusic148

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    Whatever. Another spec change. I kinda wish it was still a free-for-all. Anything goes. Turbines, six wheels, active ground effects, alternate fuels.....it used to be MUCH more interesting. Like NASCAR was. Meh. I'd rather watch GP bikes these days.
  5. hachi kid

    hachi kid

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    well, F1 was never a free for all. CanAm was the closest the world ever got to a true open formula...the only rules in that series when it started was it had to have a place for two seats, and the wheels had to be covered. that eventually lead to the 2000hp 917/30. it was only advertised to have reached 1500hp, but Roger Penske is always known for playing his cards close to his chest...people who used to work on the car have quoted it for being closer to 2000hp in quali trim with the boost turned up. insanity.

    but back F1. there is no possible way F1 cars could be a free for all anymore. the cars would literally be undrivable by any human if they were so. the cars would just simply be beyond human capability. they're doing what they can to slow the cars down right now to keep things at some reasonably sane level without making them too slow.

    that being said, limiting them to 15,000 rpm's is crap, and adding about 1000 miles to the engine life is crap.....hopefully it doesn't slow them down too much...I miss when they had 1000hp V10's...
  6. Major Softie

    Major Softie

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    Didn't need 1500 hp to be exciting. Back in the days of Juan Fangio, Jack Brabham, Phil Hill, Graham Hill - that was scary ****. Especially the pre-war Alfas that Fangio was still driving and winning in in the early 50's. 420 hp out of a supercharged straight 8 1500 - all in an open antique:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Talk about "when men were men."
    In those cars, when you crashed, you died - and they crashed way too often.
  7. Technotitclan

    Technotitclan Lurking TB from work Supporting Member

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    Because F1 is the breading ground for innovative automotive technology that eventually trickles down to everyday road cars I look forward to it. Forcing them to use smaller engines basically means these guys have to use the same everyday platforms that I drive on my way to work. Maybe these rules will result in small motors running 300+ bhp wile getting 50mpg. Honestly I would love that. My dad was a part of the muscle car generation but taught me that proper tuning and efficiency is more important than displacement and proved it with his small block that crushed all the big blocks.
  8. jp58

    jp58

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    I'm interested to see how it shakes out and trickles down to everyday vehicles.

    Being in the Nascar belt, we don't get a lot of F1 or Indy talk, but I'm a pretty avid fan of IndyCar and I try and catch the F1 races when they are in a friendly time zone.

    On the gearing aspect, does that mean they have to use the same transmission/gearing for all the circuits?

    And on the ERS, is that similar to the "push to pass" that the IndyCars were using, or is it unrelated entirely?
  9. i_got_a_mohawk

    i_got_a_mohawk

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    I love the engineering prowess of these teams, the power and speed they can generate from relatively small engines is spectacular!

    I hope they get the tyre nonsense sorted out.
  10. dmusic148

    dmusic148

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    I don't buy this statement at all. There would be nothing to gain by building ridiculous cars. The teams would make them as powerful as possible, within durability and driveability limits or they will lose, and injure or kill their drivers.
    In fact I bet they would end up being very similar in performance to what we see now, but with interesting technological variations.
  11. bluesblaster

    bluesblaster

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    so they're going to be even more obnoxious sounding than they are already, they sound more like a very loud mosquto than a real race car. Why not chuck all the uber expensive technology and throw a real motor in them and let the drivers race instead of the computer, at the rate there going pretty soon the driver will become obsolete.
  12. nortonrider

    nortonrider

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    Honestly, that wouldn't surprise me one bit.

    I really expect to see a generation of pilotless fighter jets in my lifetime.
    (predator drones being just the first step).

    Heck, they are already operating remote control vehicles on Mars, so getting a race car around a track would seem like childs play.
  13. metalhead398

    metalhead398

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    If you mean like change the gear ratios, I think that they can still do that. Otherwise they might actually have to eliminate the "oddball" races like Monaco (mostly acceleration) and Canada (top speed). As for the ERS, I can't say I know. I think it might be somewhat like push-to-pass, except 160 bhp for 33 seconds a lap. That last part I know for sure, but for all I know it will be passive to the driver but programmable for certain parts of the track. Granted thats a little far-fetched, but it would be cool.
  14. sloasdaylight

    sloasdaylight

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    I was a little irritated when I heard they were going to be going to a 1.6L turbo V6, but we'll see. I'd be lying though if I said that Suzuki's return to the premier class in MotoGP has more of my attention than the F1 changes. Frankly, I'd really like F1 cars to go back to the big, high revving, naturally aspirated V10s from a couple years ago.

    The idea that the engines in F1 can be a stressed member now will also provide some interesting advances in tech. Ducati tried the engine as a stressed member a while back on their MotoGP bikes and didn't have much success with it, so I'm curious to see what these F1 teams will do with that as a possibility.
  15. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member

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    Disclosures:
    HPF Technology: Protecting the Pocket since 2007
    I'm not a racing fan, but I think it's cool that they have to figure out how to get world class racing performance out of an engine smaller than the one in my minivan.
  16. bluesblaster

    bluesblaster

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    I dont follow F1 that much anymore, so is this a weight saving issue or are they just trying this for the sake of trying something different?. I would get more interest in this again if they went back to normally aspirated V10's as well, call me old fashion but I like my race cars to roar not buzz in a high pitched shrill.
  17. Passinwind

    Passinwind Charlie Escher Supporting Member

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    At least some of the engine manufacturers greatly prefer to work on something arguably more relevant to modern day passenger cars -- for instance Honda opted back into F1 mainly because of this. The same thing held when IndyCar went back to turbos (which many fans greatly preferred to begin with). No one has said much about the increasingly important hybrid aspect of the new regulations, which I think is pretty cool.

    Personally, I am far more excited by the prospect of Bernie E. getting kicked to the curb before next season.
  18. DeathFromBelow

    DeathFromBelow

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    This^. So. Much. This!

    Modern F1 is nothing but a yawn-fest.
  19. hgiles

    hgiles

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    Innovation and creativity are borne from constraints. Rules changes don't bother me, the best drivers in the world are still going to show up and compete. The best engineers, scientists, team principals and aerodynamicists are still going to compete. Getting more from less is actually a good mindset as far as I am concerned.

    As long as the "best" are attracted and competing in the sport, the rules and regulations don't bother me a bit.
  20. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito

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    It's never been a "free-for-all."

    Personally, I like the changes. Not only will it shake things up, but it will hopefully yield some exciting new tubro tech.

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