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9V Lithium Batteries

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Geri O, Jan 10, 2014.


  1. Geri O

    Geri O

    Sep 6, 2013
    Florence, MS
    I tried an Eveready Advanced lithium battery in my Music Man Stingray with the pop-out battery holder. But the battery went in halfway and stuck. I had to disassemble the battery compartment to get the battery out. This particular battery was quite larger than regular 9V batteries, but I didn't catch that until it was jammed in the compartment.

    Does anyone know of a lithium 9V battery that isn't oversize, so to save me some money buying them to check?...:oops:))

    Thanx,
    Geri O
     
  2. SamJ

    SamJ Founder - Fender MIA Club Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    PDX / SFO / HNL
    I'm using those batteries on my Fenders' with the old fashioned style battery compartment, they're great... last forever, have a great stable shelf life. I too am interested in using them in my Stingray but now that I've read this I'm reluctant. I wish there was a simple replacement for the Stingray's battery compartment.. I know some like it but I find it cheap and plasticy..
     
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  4. SamJ

    SamJ Founder - Fender MIA Club Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    PDX / SFO / HNL
    I'm using those batteries on my Fenders' with the old fashioned style battery compartment, they're great... last forever, have a great stable shelf life. I too am interested in using them in my Stingray but now that I've read this I'm reluctant. I wish there was a simple replacement for the Stingray's battery compartment.. I know some like it but I find it cheap and plasticy..
     
  5. Honch

    Honch

    Sep 7, 2006
    I have two of them inside a headless bass Klein copy. Whenever I am doing repair, or changing strings (once a year) on it, I am checking the batteries. Still each at 8.95 volts after ...hmmm...is it the seventh year? I have NOT wired them to produce 18v output, but wired them so they are at 9v but longer instead.
     
  6. I don't have any active basses so batteries are something I don't have to worry about there. I DO however run a wireless. Recently I tried a lithium in it and yes , it outlasted the regular ones I had been using by three or four times. The problem I ran into with lithium is that when they run out , they do it very quickly. My wireless has a battery indicator light on it. Green means I'm good to go and when it turns red , with regular batteries I can finish up a set but need to change it before I start another set. With the lithium , I was toward the end of a set and saw it turn red. No problem I thought ,I'll just finish up the last couple of songs and change it. It completely died on the next song. Fortunately I keep a spare on top of my amp and changed it mid song in about 15 seconds but I won't use lithium in it again cause when they go they do it very quickly.
    I do have an Ovation 12 string that uses batteries and I might think about using one in it but I'm leary even of that. Yes they last a really long time in a guitar but I really worry about them crapping out in the middle of a song. In my Ovation , with conventional batteries , I get plenty of warning when the battery is getting low ,both a low batt indicator and the sound slowly deteriorates.
    I have also used lithiums in the construction industry and had the same experience. They have lots of power , they last longer than conventional batteries , but when they run out , they run out very quickly. They last 3 times longer but cost three times as much so it's pretty much a wash as far as expenses. For now , I'm sticking with the conventional batteries.
     
  7. samson3382

    samson3382 Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2009
    Boise, Idaho
    I've noticed the same, in construction. Rechargeable lithiums also seem to charge faster.
    I have never had a battery die on stage though. But I only use them in one bass, that doesn't get played much, and keep a tester handy.
    I recall reading somewhere that some 9v lithiums may put out slightly over 9v and damage or overdrive preamps. But I still use them on occasion and haven't had any issues.
     
  8. SamJ

    SamJ Founder - Fender MIA Club Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    PDX / SFO / HNL
    I actually switched to the Energizer Advanced Lithiums (they're not rechargeable).. They last twice as long and are very stable for long term storage. I'm not using them in all my active basses as well as some pedals.
     
  9. ggunn

    ggunn

    Aug 30, 2006
    Austin, TX
    Does a Stingray have the same type of battery compartment as a Bongo - the flip out compartments with the copper contacts in the bottom? I agree that it's not a very good design. I had so much trouble with mine losing contact with the batteries that I removed it and replaced it with a couple of simple battery clips and a plastic plate to cover the hole.
     
  10. jd56hawk

    jd56hawk

    Sep 12, 2011
    I used an Ultralife lithium 9 volt in my Sterling SUB 4...the silver one, not the black and orange one which looks bigger.
    Only one I saw at whatever Walmart I stopped by.
     
  11. SamJ

    SamJ Founder - Fender MIA Club Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    PDX / SFO / HNL
    They are the same flip type, and the battery works perfectly well in there.. fits snug but not too snug.

    This is the exact brand and model...

    03d945c1-2a0a-4efd-a065-412657830aa5_300.jpg
     
  12. bassbenj

    bassbenj

    Aug 11, 2009
    I've been trying those for some time and did have a weird experience. About a year ago I put one in my Alembic. Maybe played it once since then. So a couple of days ago I pull it out and try it. Dead as doornail. Test battery ZERO volts. Date on battery still way in future. I can't imagine what could have discharged it. I guess maybe some kind of fluke. Will try again.

    My biggest gripe about unrechargeable lithium batteries that while they cost more and last longer so it's a wash, the problem is if you leave one on. I used them in my metronome that eats batteries like mad and also in my little iriver radio/recorder/mp3 player. In either case if I get absent minded and leave it on you rack up 3 times the loss from the dead battery.
     
    SamJ likes this.
  13. SamJ

    SamJ Founder - Fender MIA Club Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    PDX / SFO / HNL
    you mean like this??? ;)


    sorry couldn't resist the pun!


    12672.jpg
     
    Honch likes this.
  14. ggunn

    ggunn

    Aug 30, 2006
    Austin, TX
    Is the battery compartment itself not a problem for you? My Bongo would occasionally just go dead and pressing on the battery compartment lids would bring it back on. Sometimes if one of the compartment lids would get bumped while I was playing I would get a loud POP from my amp. I took the compartment assembly out and bent the copper contacts so that they would make better contact with the batteries, and that would work for a while but the problem would return. Eventually I just pulled the whole thing out and replaced it with a couple of regular 9V clips and a plastic plate to cover the hole and a couple of pieces of foam to keep the batteries from rattling around. No problems since. I might try those Li ion batteries now since the battery size is no longer an issue.
     
  15. SamJ

    SamJ Founder - Fender MIA Club Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 22, 2006
    PDX / SFO / HNL
    works on both of my EBMM basses... both use a single 9v battery. I wonder if the problem you had was more related to your specific bass and how it was wired (maybe too much play)... These do fit more snug, but thats' not a problem, it's a plus if anything. I also use it on my spector and Fender basses with no problems.
     
  16. Honch

    Honch

    Sep 7, 2006
    http://www.emgpickups.com/media/productfile/p/o/powertips_tricks_0230-0190c.pdf

    Food for thought there. Regarding active pickups and their current draw. While manufacturers lists voltage they never lists current draw. A fire alarm draws nanomA and lithium batteries lasts 10 years without ever oxidizing, or leave gunk residue from leaking. I find that lithium does not leak after quite a few years. Regardless of using them or not. It's peculiar that lithium has a shelf past date, but they're even recommended to be used in fire alarms for at least 10 years.

    "
    Battery Life:
    The typical 9-Volt Alkaline battery is rated at 500 maH (Milliamp Hours).
    Lithium batteries can be rated as high as 1200 maH. The more current capacity
    (maH) the battery has, the longer it will last. The most important specification
    (known as the “hours to cutoff voltage”) is often not specified by the makers.
    The cutoff voltage is typically 1/2 of the original battery voltage, or 4.5V in this
    case. Because batteries are used in so many different applications it's hard to predict
    battery life"


    I only know that the old Peavey Cirrus basses ate batteries for breakfast, which meant that a lot of people who did not want to change the pickups characteristic sound, went on to phantom power instead. Which is a nuisance and cumbersome. I'd rather change pickups. There's so many out there by now so you will be able to find something that is a direct replacement for them in sound. There's absolutely nothing someone can shove down my throat in saying that such sound from those pickups can't be achieved with other means of power. Or less current draw. Totally bogus IMHO. Hey, even passive ones like Villex and Q-tuner nails active tones these days, however at a price.
     



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