Adjuster Removal

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by bassist1962, Dec 15, 2012.


  1. bassist1962

    bassist1962

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    I did a search and found nothing, so I am asking. The only problem I have with my bass is string height. Even with the adjusters all the way down, it is still high. What effect would rmoving the adjusters have on string height? These are aluminum adjusters & the threads go to the end of the leg, so trimming the bridge does not seem to be an option. Has anyone tried this?
     
  2. Andrew McGregor

    Andrew McGregor

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    Not going to work, because the adjuster is now part of the bridge.

    If you're in that situation, the neck is probably moving... while you could cut the bridge down a bit, eventually the underlying problem is going to have to be dealt with.
     
  3. josiah goldfish

    josiah goldfish

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    You could trim the top of the bridge, but this would depend on how close it is to the heart. There's numerous posts here about how to do it.

    You could also trim the threaded side of the bridge foot and trim the ends of the adjusters (assuming they're one piece adjusters, you could take the feet off, remove the adjusters and cut the top of the threaded side of the feet). Difficult to explain, am I making sense?

    Also, what's the measurement of your overstand? If your bridge is too high at the lowest it'll go, you either have ape overstand or a poorly cut bridge.

    Good luck,
    Joe
     
  4. bassist1962

    bassist1962

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    The neck joint is solid & not moving. Yes they are one piece adjusters, so I could take a few threads off the adjuster itself & trim the bridge leg down. I havent measured the front to heart, but was thinking that trimming the front would work. I would rather keep the adjusters for the reason everyone has them installed. It gets me that the luthier set an adjustable bridge in this manner.
     
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  6. bassist1962

    bassist1962

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    btw how do I measure the overstand?
     
  7. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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    Hi.

    How's that even possible?

    Or did You have the adjusters installled by someone who didn't have the wits to cut out the thumbwheel thickness?
    If that's the case, take it back and politely ask 'em to complete the installation.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  8. robobass

    robobass

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    Why can't you trim the bridge legs? You can't easily do this by hand, of course, but it's a snap with a table saw or various other machines. I don't see any reason for cutting the adjusters themselves.
     
  9. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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  10. Greg Clinkingbeard

    Greg Clinkingbeard

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    I wouldn't use a table saw unless I wasn't too fond of all of my fingers.;) I have cut down bridge legs on a compound miter saw because that's what I have and the bridge can be held securely against the fence. The angles can be matched with near perfection. A good band saw is another option.

    Without seeing the bridge it's impossible to give more advice.
     
  11. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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    Hi.

    :)

    A snap indeed.

    Not a nice one though, a strong possibility of a busted finger just like Greg there said. Not to mention the ruined bridge.

    Bridges are cheap, fingers ain't.

    I use a band saw for such jobs.

    Regards
    Sam
     
  12. tyb507

    tyb507

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    Are you talking about removing threads from the adjusters to lower the string height? If the adjustment is bottomed out to the point of the bridge contacting the wheels top and bottom, that won't gain anything. You do need to remove bridge material either from the top of the bridge, or the legs.

    Or is the adjustment reaching its lowest point before the legs bottom out on the wheel? In that case, I guess you could remove some of the threaded post to gain some adjustment. Easier than trying to drill and tap farther into the leg, and I guess removing leg material wouldn't gain any more adjustment in that case, either. So you'd have to remove some of the post or cut down the top of the bridge. IIRC, some folks say that the bridge shouldn't be bottomed out on the adjuster wheels, that there should always be a bit of space.

    Oh yeah, keep your bridge away from your table saw.
     
  13. josiah goldfish

    josiah goldfish

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    +1 keep away from the table saw!

    And surely bottoming out the adjusters would make it more like a solid bridge? I agree that when you adjust them the thread might bite, but if you keep them a tiny bit open that solves that.

    I currently use an adjustable bridge but I keep the adjuster turned up a bit, just because I like a reasonably high action. Once I'm comfortable with height I might swap for a solid bridge or replace the top with one that doesn't need the adjuster so high.

    Anyway, good luck
     
  14. JoeyNaeger

    JoeyNaeger

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    Is your fingerboard solidly glued down at the heel of the neck?

    Have you looked at your bridge from the side to see if it's tilting towards the fingerboard?

    Did your luthier fit the bridge for you, and if so, did you feel the action was too high when he or she did the work?
     
  15. robobass

    robobass

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    What's all this bias against table saws? I agree that those Sears Craftsman P.O.S.'s in many dads' basements are finger eaters, but I've got a professional saw with a sliding table and lot's of jigs to hold the work properly. I fitted these adjusters in about ten minutes. I can't imagine doing it as quickly and cleanly with a band saw or any other tool for that matter.

    Any cutting tool, even a paring knife, is dangerous if you aren't well trained and cautious.

    [​IMG]

    Yes I know the holes aren't perfectly placed. Not sure what I was thinking:meh:
     
  16. Eric Rene Roy

    Eric Rene Roy Supporting Member

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    Agreed. A compound miter saw can be mighty dangerous...that's the only power tool in the shop that's tried to take all my fingers (thank goodness stock jammed the blade). A good table saw with the right jigs and safety measures is DOBA.
     
  17. robobass

    robobass

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    Was the work done for you or a previous owner? It could simply be that the person who ordered the work played with very high action. I you ordered the work, then your luthier should fix it.
     
  18. robobass

    robobass

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    DOBA? Is that "Dead on Balls Accurate". Had to really search!
     
  19. tyb507

    tyb507

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    Touché. If one is skilled and comfortable with a table saw, and can patiently set up a proper jig to ensure accuracy, go gettum.
     
  20. Eric Rene Roy

    Eric Rene Roy Supporting Member

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    ;)
     
  21. robobass

    robobass

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    For sure. It's all about the jigs. I've been using table saws since I was like twelve years old and the only time I did injure myself was just a few years ago when I got lazy and tried to push through a very small piece by holding it against the fence with my fingers. The piece shifted and shot out, knocking my knuckle against the blade. Fortunately it didn't cut very deep. It was like an Old Testament warning from the saw: Always give me the respect I'm due, or next time your punishment will be real!
     

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