Antithesis of Fender Jazz

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by SIFJiggy, Jan 15, 2013.


  1. SIFJiggy

    SIFJiggy

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Hey TBers - this is a wildly open-ended and subjective question that might aggravate some...

    Right now I'm playing a 2012 Hand Stained Jazz (mahogany w/ maple neck) and I friggin love it... BUT

    I have chronic GAS syndrome and really want to find something that sounds totally different. Something with a little less "smoothness"? I guess... I was thinking something along the lines of one of the new Gibson EB basses - My budget is more like half that so I'm debating something like a Blacktop P-Bass or Yamaha BB424.

    Just something that will give a different sound - maybe hotter and grittier.

    Let me also put the caveat in here that "go play a bunch and see what you like" is a crap-answer. I really don't have the time and if you've noticed, brick and mortar stores have the diverse selection of a mid 1940s German army...
    so that's why I ask my TB homies.

    Thanks in advance.
  2. pacojas

    pacojas "FYYA BUN" Supporting Member

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    Oct 11, 2009
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    MEXICANADAMERICA
    raise the pups and lower the strings!;)
  3. Buskman

    Buskman

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Location:
    Jersey Shore, USA
    Let's see: something with a little less smoothness/grittier tone & half the price of the new Gibson EB series...

    Seems to me that you just described a MIM build (or similar) Precision. Squier CV, if you want to save a little extra coin.

    I think we're done here. ;)
  4. unclejane

    unclejane Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Well, I can always cite the two basses I play nowadays, since precisely because they _don't_ sound like a jazz bass is why I have em :)

    They're my G&L L2K and Carvin Bunny Brunel 4 string FL's. Probably anything with a big musicman style humbucker at the bridge will sound quite different.

    The L2K is an oddity because it actually is easy to get a jazz bass tone out of it, at a rate of approx. 80%. Soloing the bridge PU in parallel mode gives a good approximation of the jazz nasally burp. Any other setting, though, and it sounds very different, with a much hotter, woolier tone.

    The Bunny I can't get to resemble a jazz bass at all no matter what I do, for which I'm truly grateful.

    The MM Sterling or Stingray is another couple basses I've played that give a very different sound than a jazz bass. So I'd check those out also.

    LS
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  6. ggvicviper

    ggvicviper P is the Key. Call me Marc or Marky Potatoes. Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Fresh Meadows (Queens), NY, US
    +1 on the MIM Precision for grit. The MIM I own is very treble-heavy and raw sounding, as opposed to my MIA which is pretty smooth and fat. MIA also has a good share of treble, but not as much as the MIM.
  7. SIFJiggy

    SIFJiggy

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    I'm hearing a lot of P-love. But I was thinking Blacktop because of humbuckers --- or then what about the Blacktop jazz since these split coils are a real difference maker... I am a big fan of the J-neck too - so that might work.
  8. sven kalmar

    sven kalmar

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    epiphone? thunderbird? EB? i dont know these instrumenst but they might be quite cool..
  9. jobo4

    jobo4

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    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Is a Sterling BY MM Ray34 in your price range? Might be a nice departure.
  10. willbassyeah

    willbassyeah

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    Oct 9, 2011
    Location:
    Singapore
    I think hollowbody basses are also a great choice for you. Jack casside epiphone seems to be what you looking for I think. And don't forget use either flat or an old roundwound string on it.
  11. ggvicviper

    ggvicviper P is the Key. Call me Marc or Marky Potatoes. Gold Supporting Member

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    Blacktop J should be another good choice. Very different sound from a normal J. The neck pickup is closer to the neck, and sounds very grindy in many demos I've heard. Like a cross between a P and a Rick.
  12. jamminology101

    jamminology101

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    Endorsing Artist: Glockenklang
    I played that blacktop....its EXACTLY what u r looking for and pretty cheap too...
  13. SIFJiggy

    SIFJiggy

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    P or J?
  14. Buskman

    Buskman

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Location:
    Jersey Shore, USA
    I'd go J... Same Jazz feel (body, neck) that you're used to, with two grittier P pickups in a J-type configuration.
  15. Wallace320

    Wallace320

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2012
    Location:
    Milan, Italy
    Fender MIM BlackTop Jazz

    dual split coil pickups on a higloss finished Jazz bass neck and alder body, with himass bridge already onboard

    What d'ya need more?

    Cheers,
    Wallace
  16. SIFJiggy

    SIFJiggy

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Thanks for the input guys. Blacktoppie looks like a winner atm
  17. ggvicviper

    ggvicviper P is the Key. Call me Marc or Marky Potatoes. Gold Supporting Member

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    This should only further solidify that the Blacktop J is what you're looking for.

  18. awilkie84

    awilkie84 Supporting Member

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    Location:
    Nanaimo, BC, Canada
    Your J is smooth? I find a J is usually punch with a lot of treble.

    I'd go for something with growl, like a P or Spector. ^_^
  19. petrus61

    petrus61 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    I always thought of p's as the polar opposite because I can actually cut through a dense mix with them, whereas I'm off to an EQ noodle-fest when it comes to getting jazz's to work for me.
  20. petrus61

    petrus61 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Location:
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    Also, I don't subscribe to the whole "I can get my J to sound like a P with the neck pickup" thing. To my ears, they sound vastly different. To me, P's have a throaty bark with the tone up, while J's have sizzling snap. With tone rolled off, P's "fart" and J's "burp". Sorry for the gross analogy....
  21. SIFJiggy

    SIFJiggy

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Really depends on what song... Can't get no better while jamming some bluesy stuff at an open mic or something. But then we turn around and do a medley that goes from 'Bringing Sexy Back' to 'Killing in the Name' --- need some more punch 'n growl

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