Any recommendation for text book of II V cadence solo?

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by Yuki, Aug 27, 2013.


  1. Yuki

    Yuki

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2011
    Location:
    Tokyo
    Hi guys, I'm looking for good learning book for my bass solo study, especially for II V cadence. Please let me know if you have anything on your mind!
  2. burns_isaac

    burns_isaac

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    The absolute best thing you can do is transcribe the language from guys like Parker, Stitt, Horace Silver, etc. This is the absolute best jazz "practice" resource I've ever found, ever www.jazzadvice.com
  3. burns_isaac

    burns_isaac

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    I own all of the books man and none compare to transcribing. Save yourself hundreds of dollars, hundreds of hours of going nowhere, get on that site, study, and start transcribing. I have absolutely nothing to do with that site other than taking these guys advice and getting better.
  4. burns_isaac

    burns_isaac

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    I guess Patterns for Jazz is more of a good technique book than an improv book and the Omnibook is full of Parker's language but there is nothing that will benefit you like transcribing. You can try whatever path you want but they will all lead back to transcribing. The benefits are innumerable.
  5. Register to disable this ad
  6. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1999
    Media:
    29
    Albums:
    2
    Location:
    NYC
    Disclosures:
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    What do you think about transcribing, is that a good idea?
  7. burns_isaac

    burns_isaac

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    ^^Too funny! I just got a few albums I've been anxious to pull apart and a few cups of dark roast coffee this morning may have contributed to my overly enthusiastic and smothering responses.
  8. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1999
    Media:
    29
    Albums:
    2
    Location:
    NYC
    Disclosures:
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    If you look to the bottom right of your post, you'll see a button labeled EDIT. If you click on that after you've posted, it re-opens the post so you can type more in the original post.

    And look a little less over caffeinated....
  9. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Sorry to sound like a broken record but learning lots of tunes and memorizing them was the best exercise for this IMO. Nothing beats getting exposure to lots of different progressions in the context of a melody.
  10. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1999
    Media:
    29
    Albums:
    2
    Location:
    NYC
    Disclosures:
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Just to offer another viewpoint, there are ways to work on playing through progressions, including ii Vs, without either playing ideas that somebody wrote down or playing ideas that somebody else played with another group of musicians (none of which were you) at another time. This is an exercise that I got from my teacher that got me away from playing notes over a progression and actually expressing some kind of meaning and intent in a specific composition. To stop speaking gibberish and start making sense.
    Once you start internalising both the melody and the progression as composed, you really do start hearing lines that embellish and connect, that may not be "part" of the harmony but still move the music forward because you are hearing them in the context of the composition. And when the line you are playing is a direct and personal response to how YOU YOURSELF are hearing the song, then you're not playing notes over a progression, you're playing music.
  11. Chris Symer

    Chris Symer

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Location:
    Seattle,Wa.
    Thank you Ed!!!

Share This Page