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arco solo fav? Jazz

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by Tom Lane, Mar 27, 2014.


  1. Tom Lane

    Tom Lane Gold Supporting Member

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    Title says it all. I'm looking for more arco jazz solos to transcribe, so shred them hairs!

    BG, rock, not right now, thanks.
     
  2. Ant_C

    Ant_C

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    One of my favorite arco bass solos is Paul Chambers on the tune "I Remember You", off the Johnny Griffin album "The Congregation".

    Another great arco solo that comes to mind is Red Mitchell on "Hear Ye!", off the album "Hear Ye!" by the Red Mitchell - Harold Land Quintet.

    Ari Roland does a bowed solo on just about every track that I've heard him on (well the one's that he solos on at least). Paul Chambers has a multitude of great arco solos, as well as Lynn Seaton. Christian McBride has played some great arco solos, one that comes to mind is on "Mysterioso" off the album "Superbass 2" which is Ray Brown/John Clayton/Christian McBride all playing together.

    John Goldsby wrote a great book on the subject called "Jazz Bowing Techniques for the Improvising Bassist" ,and he plays some great arco solos as well, one that comes to mind is on "Moose The Mooch" off of his album "Space for the Bass". Here's a link to John Goldsby's book http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title...-improvising-bassist-sheet-music/5139298?ac=1
     
  3. John Goldsby

    John Goldsby Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the nice words, Ant_C. The solo you mention can be heard here, it starts at about 3:50.

    I love the solo you mention: "Hear Ye" from Red Mitchell. He played more bowed solos in his early days.

    The two other players I would add to the list of suggestions are: Slam Stewart (the "I Got Rhythm" duet with Don Byas) and Jimmie Blanton (Mr. J.B. Blues, for example). Or if you want to check out Slam's "extended techniques," how about this one?
     
  4. oliebrice

    oliebrice

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    If I had to pick just one then it'd have to be the Slam Stewart 'I Got Rhythm' that John mentions

    Some gorgeous Red Mitchell arco on 'I Concentrate on You' (duo with Lee Konitz)

    For a slghtly different take on things I'd check out David Izenzon & Ken Filiano as well
     
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  6. davidhilton

    davidhilton Supporting Member

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    Paul Chambers "Moments Notice"
     
  7. Joshua

    Joshua WJWJr Gold Supporting Member

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    Great bass playing for sure, but can I add how great the piano player sounds? Great stuff!
     
  8. John Goldsby

    John Goldsby Supporting Member

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    I'll be sure and pass that on. Martin Sasse on piano, Francesco Cafiso on alto ... Great players. Martin lives in Cologne and Francesco in Sicily.
     
  9. amusicbass123

    amusicbass123

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  10. Tom Lane

    Tom Lane Gold Supporting Member

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    My heartfelt thanks to all who contributed! I notice there weren't ANY BG or Rock contributions this time. I guess the ARCO in the title scared 'em away! LOLS! I'm not sure which of these I'll transcribe next nor when because my teacher has a say too, but once I do, I'll post the PDF as partial repayment for your kindness.
    I've been soloing more and more with the bow and I really enjoy it. Not sure that it carries through for the audience but that's not my problem. There's a unique way to get a serious swing out of the bow that I don't think I can really duplicate pizz. Plus, it sings!
     
  11. Stick_Player

    Stick_Player Banned

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  12. Feral Feline

    Feral Feline Supporting Member

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    SLAM!

    Love that cat.

    amusicbass123, thanks for that link. I don't need a chorus pedal! I just need Lynn Seaton or Christian McBride playing with me. Oh, yeah, wait... I myself would also need their level of talent. *sigh*


    Not really jazz, but lots of cool arco going on in Tango...

    Pablo Aslan starts off with arco then switches to pizz with the rest of the band then back to arco for his solo in "Ventarron"

    Fernando Cabarcos and his cousins Kicho Diaz & Pepe Diaz are probably good bets for checking out.

    *NB! I'm just starting to explore tango, so if anybody out there has better Tango arco info, please chime in.
     
  13. Eric Swanson

    Eric Swanson

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    Anything from Terry Plumeri's "Blue and Green" album.

    I think of him as the Coltrane of arco bass.
    Here's "Autumn Leaves"


     
  14. Ant_C

    Ant_C

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    +1

    I was listening to my copy of this album last night, and he plays some extraordinary lines throughout the whole album. I love his tone too, it really makes his playing standout to me. My personal favorites off the album are Beautiful Love, Dolphin Dance, and Footprints.
     
  15. deste

    deste

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    Simplicity and effectiveness? Paul Chambers on John Coltrane's "Stardust" (can't recall the album now, it was on an old cassette, some thirty years ago...)
     
  16. deste

    deste

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    Well, if you started from Kicho, you started from the best of the Masters...
    Other good solos are those by Hector Console (listen to the late Piazzolla works -even if it's not classic tango - like the Quinteto Tango Nuevo -i.e. "Tango Nuevo - Hora Cero - Zero Hour"), or the trio Agri-Zarate-Falasca. Or the highly classic Sexteto Mayor. The variacción (solo) in "Canaro in Paris" is very often played by the bass, even in the unconfortable key of F#minor.
     
  17. Les Fret

    Les Fret

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    My favorite arco jazz players are Eddie Gomez (for example his 'Caprice' or Bill Evans 'Elsa'), Stanley Clarke and Miroslav Vitous. They have a more melodic approach to bowing as opposed the swing bowed lines that most jazz players do.
     
  18. brianrost

    brianrost

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    Slam, Slam and more Slam!!! The sides with Art Tatum on Capitol are good ones.

    Ronnie Boykins with Sun Ra on "Heliocentric Worlds vol. 1"
     
  19. John Goldsby

    John Goldsby Supporting Member

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    Wow — Ronnie Boykins and Slam Stewart in the same post. Diverse taste you have there, sir!
     
  20. milomo

    milomo

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    I don't know how well he's know outside of NYC, but my friend Paul Gill is a great bass player. Here's some representative arco work with Peter Zak's trio.
     
  21. Eric Swanson

    Eric Swanson

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    I have always been, and remain, a bit surprised by bassists playing arco jazz solos with single-note-per-bow articulation. I know many folks do it, but I've never quite understood why it continues to be so common.

    Horn players don't generally play one breath per note, neither do singers. Why would a bassist, soloing arco? It has always puzzled me. The bow is our breath, our sound. Shouldn't the breath be taken in a way that makes sense, musically, with the phrase or idea being played?

    If we are trying to emulate the voice, or perhaps hornlike phrasing, why not play phrases in one bow stroke, or at least smoothly changed, combined strokes? I dig the bop vocabulary of some bassists, but often struggle to get past the crunchy, single-note bowings. I want to forget about the instrument, not be reminded of it with each stroke.

    Anybody else have thoughts on this?
     

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