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Are there any tuning pegs that require a big hole?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by DanAdams, Feb 14, 2014.

  1. DanAdams

    DanAdams

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    I bought a beat up old Ibanez musician mc924 that I am going to be doing a (what most people think is dumb... http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f8/1983-ibanez-mc924-customization-advice-1046497/ ) customization, but unfortunatley I have discovered that a previous owner made a mess of the tuning peg holes. He enlarged them (poorly) so some fender style pegs could poorly fit in.
    Now I'm thinking of cleanly drilling them out larger, then fitting and gluing dowels into the holes so I can drill out and put some proper sized tuners in. But then I thought, hey maybe there are some large oddball tuners that I could make fit well without doing all that extra work.

    I know it's a longshot, but are there any bighole tuning pegs?
  2. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

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    I'm guessing you have the right approach - drill first (using a drill press to get precisely a 90-degree angle) and plug with dowels.

    However, to get an accurate answer you need to post the exact diameter of the existing tuner holes.
  3. DanAdams

    DanAdams

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    Well I can't give you a precise measurement because they are a crudely drilled mess.
    I was just hoping for a vague response like... "Brand X has giant posts on their tuners, you should check them out".
    I should probably just call a guitar hardware specialty store, but I would rather try to get some cheap eBay solution... That's just my style.
  4. MikeCanada

    MikeCanada

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    Fender-esque tuners tend to be about the biggest on the market. I can't think of a bass I have encountered with anything bigger and as you are well aware, a lot of brands use considerably smaller ones. Something else to think about: huge tuners means more weight up there, and neck-dive sucks.

    I would stick with your drill-fill-new tuners idea. 90° angle, hard wood dowel not cheap hardware store stuff, good glue, all of that advice that you really shouldn't need. I will also assume you are planning on refinishing the headstock as well. I really can't see the "donut" around your new tuners look being appealing.
  5. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

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    Agreed all around - and the weight issue is important!

    If the holes right now are irregular, you're going to have to be very careful drilling them out - if the drill bit catches in the hole and throws the neck around or jams, you will have a big problem or a totaled neck. Be careful, clamp everything down, and think three times before drilling once. This is absolutely a drill press job.
  6. RSBBass

    RSBBass

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    Given the irregular holes, you may do better with a reamer than a drill bit. Also. the grain orientation on dowels will be different from the headstock. If you are going with a clear finish, a plug cut from the same kind of wood is the way to go.
  7. DanAdams

    DanAdams

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    Good advice all around. Thanks.
    I will use a drill press and find a way to clamp the bass at the headstock angle. that will be the hardest part.
    I know a maple plug would be best, but I don't have a big deep plug cutter like that. Also the tuner ferrule will cover the dowel so aesthetics shouldn't matter and it will be such a small piece of wood that I don't think wood expansion should be an issue.
  8. MikeCanada

    MikeCanada

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    If you don't have a plug cutter but you have a lathe, you could get a piece of maple (or another hardwood) and orientate it so the grain lines up the way you need it to and turn a dowel to make plugs. If you're turning against the grain you need to cut slowly so it doesn't rip itself apart, but it can be done. If you are refinishing the headstock anyway, than I would be more worried about the strength of the repair than the orientation of the grain.
  9. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

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    I like this idea - sorry I didn't think of it! A reamer is hand-powered and gives you total control over the process. It will yield round holes, but tapered...you can follow up with a drill to get straight walls in the holes.

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