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Ash body with a walnut top

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Quackhead, Dec 5, 2012.

  1. Quackhead

    Quackhead

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    Generally, what are the forum's thoughts on this body wood combination? I've had a solid walnut body with a figured walnut top before and it was great, but for some reason my brain keeps telling me ash and walnut would be killer. Nice smooth highs and full lows and barky low mids is what I'm thinking.

    I know there are a lot of other factors that affect your tone, but just humor me please. :ninja:
  2. phillybass101

    phillybass101 Supporting Member

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    I think it's a winning combination and no longer get into discussions about whether or not wood selection makes a difference. I say if it makes a difference to you the player, then it makes a differnce to you because you're the one playing that particular axe. I have two inexpensive Brubaker brutes that I play on and they both sound really good. One is made from Nato and one is made from hard ash. Both sound aggresive and have a killer slap tone. The one made from ash though has a more refined sound. IMO it's due to the sound qualities of the hard ash.
  3. Bassmanbob

    Bassmanbob Supporting Member

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    How does this grab you? I just got it yesterday.

    [​IMG]

    Walnut burl over Swamp Ash.

    I'm not sure of how much the walnut/ash woods contributed to it, but this particular bass is a bit more compressed compared to others I've had. But just by boosting the bass, it kicks it and cuts through nicely. At least it did at rehearsal last night.
  4. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Supporting Member

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    IME the thickness of the top can be a big factor. That's why I prefer relatively thin cosmetic tops.
  5. phillybass101

    phillybass101 Supporting Member

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    Bassmanbob that is a really nice bass you got there. Are those Nordy pickups?
  6. Bassmanbob

    Bassmanbob Supporting Member

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    Yes. Nordstrand J and MM.

    Thank you. It's a gem.
  7. phillybass101

    phillybass101 Supporting Member

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  8. MCS4

    MCS4 Supporting Member

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    I can tell you that I have a custom Zon on order with that exact wood combination, for essentially the same tonal reasons you mentioned. My main bass is a walnut-bodied Carvin, which is very compressed and mid-rangey (in a good way), and needs a bit of bass boost to really sing, somewhat like Bassmanbob mentioned. My thoughts were that going with the walnut top would keep some of those characteristics but partially "normalize" them by mixing with the ash sound.

    I also know that Joe Zon himself has said that he believes a top wood will have this effect of coloring the sound of bass, all other things being equal.

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