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Behringer BX1200

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by MarshallNole, Dec 13, 2013.

  1. MarshallNole

    MarshallNole Supporting Member

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    Is it common for this amp to have a hiss/hum when you turn the volume or certain controls to certain levels? Mine especially does this when connected to a pedal. I got it for cheap with my bass guitar. I'm just learning, maybe this is just a cheap amp?
  2. jeff7bass

    jeff7bass

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    Hissing and humming can mean a few things. First, if it barely hisses when there's no effects, it's likely not the amp.
    Two, if you have two single coil pickups and one is turned down, you'll get hum.
    Three, if you installed some of those new energy saving lightbulbs, those could be causing hum because it did at our rehearsal space.
    What kind of pedal are you using? You might have to change the settings on the pedal or the amps EQ when you're using the pedal.
  3. B-string

    B-string Supporting Member

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    Yes they are "value" equipment but if this happens with pedals then it is most likely the pedals and not the amp.
    See jeff7bass's response above.
  4. MarshallNole

    MarshallNole Supporting Member

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    It happens with or without the pedal when the volume hits a certain point. It's just a hum like you know the amp is on. I'd rather not hear it. I am going to assume the amp sucks and when I upgrade I will not have this issue.
  5. Pimmsley

    Pimmsley

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    To be honest, my brief, unpleasant experience with a BX4500 was a hummy buzzy one. It seemingly had a lot of power but introduced hiss and hum into the signal path that would, like your experience, increase with volume. It also threw out huge amounts of EMI that made it noisy with passive pickups.

    I agree that you would have less problems with something else... The classifieds here have a lot of good deals to be had. I can highly recommend an Aguilar TH-350 as a great place to start, lots of balls and no hiss to speak of, inspiring to play through... Quality at a reasonable price ;)
    Good luck !
  6. B-string

    B-string Supporting Member

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    Plenty of high quality used heads to be had for $200 or less before plunking down $450-500 for Tone Hammer.
  7. MarshallNole

    MarshallNole Supporting Member

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    I already have my gear in mind . I am going for anything that moves me towards a Tool/Justin Chancellor tone.
  8. punkjazzben

    punkjazzben

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    My BX1200 doesn't do this 'on its own'. I've had it for ten years, and despite the groupthink here at TB regarding Behringer, it's a perfectly good amp for the money.

    The hiss/hum could be from your mains. Crank the amp, play an in-tune G string lightly. If there's a bit of a warble, like two harmonics not quite in tune, its probably 60khz hum from the mains.
  9. MarshallNole

    MarshallNole Supporting Member

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    The hum I am talking about comes from the amp when nothing is being played. It is there 100% of the time.
  10. punkjazzben

    punkjazzben

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    Yep, and the G-string test is just to confirm whether the hum is in the 60khz range. The sound is easily identifiable once you know it, but if you have a chromatic tuner with a microphone or a tuner on your phone (like DaTuner), crank the amp up so you get the hum loud and clear and see roughly where it is.
  11. Pimmsley

    Pimmsley

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    Agreed B, that's why the first thing I said was 'The classifieds here have a lot of good deals to be had.'

    I also think the TH-350 is great first amp of quality for the price, but as the OP already has that covered.
  12. alaskaleftybass

    alaskaleftybass

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    Welcome to Talkbass. Be prepared for a flogging and long lectures for owning a Behringer product and a combo amp. You will be immediately deluged to sell it, go to Craigslist and buy a used bass head and cabinet. It will need to be an approved brand name, even though most of them are made in China, with the exception of a couple American products.

    Before you run it off a cliff, try and get it to a knowledgeable older musician to listen to it, they probably have an idea of what it is. Or if you can bring it to a repair shop and ask for an estimate for repair. They may diagnose the issue and tell you if it's worth it to fix it or not. Oh, and don't start calling it a piece of crap to feel accepted by anyone. There are other Behringer owners here, and often a Behringer employee chimes into these forums.

    Good luck! :)

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