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Best Books for learning bass as a beginner

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by KongDan, Mar 8, 2012.


  1. KongDan

    KongDan

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    What are the best books out there (preferably on the internet), for those novice to the bass. I've got "learn visually bass guitar" and it's pretty good but doesn't seem to have much stuff on advancing your techniques.
     
  2. fearceol

    fearceol

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Location:
    Ireland
  3. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2009
    Location:
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    Technique comes after you know your way around, i.e. after you have the fundamentals under your fingers, THEN we start worrying about technique.

    As a beginner get the fundamentals down first, technique can/will come later. Online Bass Lessons at StudyBass.com and Bass Guitar for Dummies is where I would point you.

    BTW welcome to the bottom end.
     
  4. funkybass

    funkybass

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2006
    Location:
    Indiana
    I think proper, basic technique should be learned from the start. No need to start with bad habits. I highly recommend Todd Johnsons technique builders.
     
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  6. dontay

    dontay

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    I would recommend purchasing the TeachMeBassGuitar lessons by Roy Vogt

    http://www.thunderrow.com/ or teachmebassguitar.com

    Great lessons and access to a forum of others learning as well. Well worth the price
     
  7. HuntYouDown

    HuntYouDown

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    Yeah, Bass Guitar for Dummies is a must have. It has tons of useful information. A very good book.
     
  8. masturbasser

    masturbasser

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Location:
    Bossier City, LA
    When I first started on bass 11 years ago I was convinced I could learn to play from a book if I "studied" alot. I soon found out how wrong I was when I first started jamming with people. Concentrating too much on theory made my playing "robotic". Took me a while to undo the damage.

    Buying a book is ok, just don't expect much. Concentrate on basic music theory and correct technique/posture. That's about all the "Play Bass like a Pro" books are good for.

    EDIT: Bass Guitar for Dummies is the one I found most useful FWIW.
     
  9. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1999
    Location:
    NYC
    Disclosures:
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
  10. turbo chicken

    turbo chicken

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Location:
    Dallas FtWorth Texas
    studybass.com (got me started)... FREE!!!

    hal leonard Bass Method by Ed Friedland ... go on ebay and get a used one for super cheap less than 10 bucks shipped

    http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_sacat=0&_nkw=hal leonard bass method&rt=nc&LH_ItemCondition=4

    or amazon for super super cheap ... http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...?ie=UTF8&qid=1331269680&sr=8-2&condition=used

    you have to challenge yourself though... you should be able to understand and read and play the exercise perfect thru several times... if you can't play it perfect you only cheating yourself...
     
  11. simmerdown

    simmerdown

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Location:
    mountainous area, USA
    ^^^^^this


    Bass Guitar for Dummies is the one I found most useful FWIW.

    same here
     
  12. mcglyph

    mcglyph

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    Only one book. Bass Encyclomedia. Not much on technique just theory, scales, modes, progressions and everything else!!! Plus if you want to study with the dude who wrote it(if you are that motivated and focused), you can call him up. You should call him and just do the first free lesson, he is off the charts smart and very specific in his teaching. Check it.
     
  13. Synthax

    Synthax

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
    Location:
    SW PA
    I use a bunch of different books, I recently took up bass myself. The dummies book and the complete idiots guide are nice. I also enjoy http://www.amazon.com/FastTrack-Bas...=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331673516&sr=1-2. The fast track books are nice and they teach you some licks that apply to different styles easily, along with the theory. The 3 biggest things I have used are the exercises here particularly pacmans scale, they really give your fingers a workout, stu hamms video on trufire and the fast track bass books. Also, try standing up when you practice, i just discovered how much it helps your body more easier around the fretboard. And dont forget to do scales chords etc. i start every practice with an hour of major scale, minor scale, major and minor triads with octave, milolydian mode and pentatonic scale. It warms the hands up, teaches you the fretboard etc. call out the note names when doing this, helps a ton, and quickly too . This is what has worked for me, not sure what will work for you but i hope it helps. Good luck

    Neil
     
  14. Soverntear

    Soverntear

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    Location:
    London
    Maybe I'm just really dumb but I got his book when I first started and it just did nothing for me. I would recommend the Hal Leonard Bass Method 1-3. Much easier to jump in to and it teaches you reading.
     
  15. electrablue

    electrablue

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    +1 on the Hal Leonard Method 1-3.
     
  16. fep

    fep

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Location:
    San Diego
    Another +1 on Hal Leonard

    I'm first a guitar player (aka guitard around these parts), 2nd a piano player and am now working on bass. So I've been through a ton of guitar books and a few piano books also.

    I'm on the third book of the Hal Leonard Method. This is the "real stuff", you learn to read which I consider mandatory for any musician, and the play along CD is a great tool.
     
  17. Shrekster

    Shrekster

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    I just began on the bass also....played piano, primarily Hammond B-3 for 30-years. Always wanted to play the bass so here I am (mid 50's). In learning the notes on the bass, I picture the piano keys in my mind. I'm going to try several of the books mentioned in this thread especially the Shermusic.com. studybass.com, and Hal Leonard method...really want to learn theory and technique. Any other helpful ideas are welcomed. Thx. :bassist:
     
  18. e2274964

    e2274964

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2012
    Agreed, this is what I started with as well
     
  19. apollo18

    apollo18

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Location:
    North East P.A.
    Emedia Bass method... I think this DVD is a great place to start and it gets over looked a lot. I use it with a zoom b2, a usb cord and my laptop with headphone. It has old song in it but before you know it you are starting to learn the notes on the fretboard while playing the songs and thats what its all about... learning.
     

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