1. Welcome to TalkBass 2014! If you're new here, we just went through a major site upgrade. Please post all concerns and bugs to the Forum Usage Issues forum. We will be monitoring that forum. Thank you for all of your feedback.

    The TB Android app is working, you may need to uninstall/reinstall. The iPhone app is now updated and should work after you upgrade. TalkBass is responsive to any screen size, so we recommend using your mobile browser for full functionality.

    Please read the TalkBass 2014 FAQ for lots of great info on the new software.

Best strings for punchy midrange?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by albioncalling, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. albioncalling

    albioncalling

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2014
    Likes Received:
    0
    Salutations chaps,

    I've been playing bass properly for about 5-6 years but i'm afraid I've committed that cardinal sin of only changing strings as they break, which means I have relatively little experience with different brands of strings. My band has a series of club shows coming up and as my current strings are getting along a bit I've decided its probably best I get a new set. I'm beginning to get to a stage in my playing where I've started to experiment with my tone so i've gotten to thinking that I should experiment with some other string brands to try and find the best ones for me, as i'm changing them anyway (in for a penny etc).

    I'm looking for a punchy midrange tone really, something that can be cranked loud and have the ability to cut through. I have a Fender Standard Mexican Precision Bass with standard gear and a maple board. I know this should be quite punchy already but anything to help it along would be great. I play a mixture of classic rock and British Indie or Britpop (boo hiss) using a mixture or picking and slap. A good example of the tone im going for is something like Andy Rourke from The Smiths, for example on tracks like "William It Was Really Nothing" if that makes sense?

    If any of you guys have gotten a great sounding punchy tone I'd love to hear what strings you use. I have experience with Ernie Ball Slinky stainless and Rotosound 66's. Ernie Ball Cobalts look good but apparently are quite low quality despite the pricetag?

    Cheers!
    Jack
  2. Hamlet7768

    Hamlet7768 Here to chew gum and rock. Still have gum. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Likes Received:
    1
    You definitely want steels. I've used LaBella steels before and they sounded really good, especially after breaking in. I'll PM you a link to a video of me using them so you can hear how they sound.
  3. Hobobob

    Hobobob Don't feed the troll, folks. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2011
    Likes Received:
    5
    My favorite, and the favorite of many here on TB, is Circle K. They're a nickel/steel blend, so they're not quite as bright as stainless but cut more than nickel. They last forever too - I have a year-old set on my 4 string that still sound like new nickels. The set on my 6'er gets a lot more use, but even they still sound almost fresh after 9 months.
  4. VeganThump

    VeganThump Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2012
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would have to echo these sentiments exactly. Can't recommend Circle K strings enough.
  5. SLaPiNFuNK

    SLaPiNFuNK Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2006
    Likes Received:
    2
    Disclosures:
    Owner: BassStringsOnline.com
    Punchy mids? Nickel iron alloy pressure wound strings.
  6. JellinWellen

    JellinWellen

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Likes Received:
    0
    Rotosound swingbass 66 stainless steel strings were designed for punching/mixcutting mids.
  7. Jensby design

    Jensby design

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Likes Received:
    0
    I also recommend Circle K strings, but I would like to add that the tension you choose plays a big role in the sound.
    I use Circle K strings at a low tension (low 30's lbs) they don't have a lot of midrange punch at that tension but same strings tuned up a step (40ish lbs) much better midrange attack.
    Finding the right tension will help the most and Circle K Strings has a great tension chart.
  8. bigbottomend

    bigbottomend

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Elites Stadium
  9. Dredmahawkus

    Dredmahawkus Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2012
    Likes Received:
    0
    Infled superalloy.....very punchy and deep even toned...and last forever.

    I find iron/nickel alloy strings seem to be a bit more punchy...and have more of the growly mids....yet no finger noise and clankyness like stainless.
  10. Duckwater

    Duckwater

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nickel/Iron strings get my vote as well when it comes to pure cutting ability, they can be almost too aggressive sounding on my main bass. Roto 66s have that classic grindy high-midrange sound that so many great tones have been sculpted from, you can't go wrong with them IMO. Labella steels are awesome too, they have a big low-midrange growl with some high-midrange cut on top.
  11. AdamR

    AdamR Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Likes Received:
    0
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: VF Cables
    examples ?
  12. BFunk

    BFunk Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2001
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am also a big fan of Circle K's. I used a 142 5 string balanced set. They are pretty bright out of the box. They mellow a little after a few hours of play and stay that way for a long time. Then the mid punch really stands out. I would also consider Thomastik-Infeld jazz flats. These flats are nothing like the traditional ones. Very strong mids, strong finger-on-string sound, almost woody sounding. Very bright for a flat. They will mellow some after a couple of weeks of play. You hear more fundamental thump after that. Great if you use distortion. They are very flexible and low tension. Some people don't like that. They are sticky at first, but get very smooth after the break-in period. They are also very expensive, but they literally last for years. Many players put 5 or more years on them before replacement. So they are very cheap in the long run.

Share This Page