Breadboarding your instruments electronics.

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Thecomedian, Nov 2, 2012.


  1. Thecomedian

    Thecomedian

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2012
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    I'd considered buying a breadboard so that I could test multiple designs at once with far less soldering and such, having something like a 5-way switch in front of all the different circuits containing caps, pots, etc, in different orders and of different values. The pickups would have some sort of electric quick-connectors like

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/i...ce=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032231

    or http://www.radioshack.com/product/i...ce=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032231

    and then connect it to the switch after a terminal strip http://www.radioshack.com/product/i...ce=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032231

    allowing fast changes between circuit designs.

    Has anyone used this? Would it be effective for finding your own desired instrument electric design?
     
  2. Stealth

    Stealth Supporting Member

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    I'd suggest using something like a 2P6T rotary, that is, something with two common poles and six rotational positions (left half of the image):

    [​IMG]

    Use the left common as input and connect the left 1-6 to different electronics or preamps. Then connect the electronics' and preamps' outputs to the right 1-6, and the right common to the output jack. That way you'd be able to rapidly switch between tone stacks and test which one's best.

    Maybe you could build it into a small box, connect it using an extremely short (10 cm) cable to a bass with no electronics in it whatsoever (except maybe a blend or pickup selector switch) and attach the box to your strap. The cable'd be short enough not to impact your tone (as longer cables might).
     
  3. Thecomedian

    Thecomedian

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    That's a lot of good info. Thanks :)
     
  4. khutch

    khutch Praise Harp Supporting Member

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    Breadboarding can be a great time saver and it may save components too because endless soldering and resoldering will eventually damage something. If it were me I would hook it all up with clip leads but anything that works for you is good.

    Ken
     
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  6. Thecomedian

    Thecomedian

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    lol, im actually playing right now with alligator clips, because I had to tear out the whole wiring and redo it. it was a mess and terrible. Most things are soldered up, but theres a spot I don't want to do until I've got the preamp back in it with the style sweeper.

    Maybe what I'm actually looking for is some kind of pedal that is a breadboard, kind of like what stealth was saying with a metal box.

    Would the signal be unmodified, unattenuated, etc, if it came straight from PU to output jack, through to the box, modified there, then to the amp?
     

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