Buffing and polishing fretboard

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by elBandito, Dec 8, 2013.


  1. elBandito

    elBandito

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Location:
    Rotten Apple
  2. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    I wouldn't use anything as high speed as a rotary tool like those fit. Those are more for polishing metal at high speed.

    I would sand it starting at 600 and work your way up to 2000. Then go to any auto parts store and get a wool buffing pad like this. Chuck it up in a hand drill and lightly buff out the fretboard, dry with no kind of compound. It should give you a really nice luster.
  3. miziomix

    miziomix Über on my mind Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Location:
    Milan, Kuala Lumpur
    I use micro mesh. Depending on wood and on whether the bass is finished clear gloss or satin, I go all the way up to 12,000 grit or stop at around 3,600/4,000 grit.
  4. elBandito

    elBandito

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Location:
    Rotten Apple
    Every other bass I owned with rosewood, ebony or wenge fretboards all had nice shiny "hard" fretboard surface. This new neck I'm working on just looks raw and dry looking. I will try some micro mesh first. Thanks.
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  6. ArtechnikA

    ArtechnikA I endorsed a check once... Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2013
    Location:
    SEPA
    Zymöl 'Bridge' is a hard carnuba wax primarily marketed for orchestral instruments. I have used it on an ebony fretless fingerboard and liked the result. This might be a nice 'final surface' treatment after the initial smoothing is done.

    In my case, and I expect most others, it darkened the wood a bit. Try it on a sample before committing to the real fretboard. You warm it to liquid with your fingers (a little at a time) and rub it into the wood, then polish away any excess before it hardens fully.

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