Cabinet shapes

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by Rockin Mike, Dec 30, 2012.


  1. Rockin Mike

    Rockin Mike Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    I'm no cabinet designer, just a bassist, but surely this has occurred to someone before...

    If the shape of a speaker chamber doesn't matter, and we desire high rigidity and low weight, why doesn't anyone make a spherical speaker enclosure?

    Obviously it would need some kind of stand so it doesn't roll over, but that's a solved problem, look at a bass drum.

    Thanks in advance to the cab design experts on the board.
  2. msaone

    msaone

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    May 13, 2012
    Wouldn't the head fall off?
  3. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

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    May 19, 2004
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    Seattle, WA
    There was a guy making cabs out of bass drum shells. There's a thread about it if you do a search.
  4. RufusB

    RufusB

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    Dec 22, 2012
    Cool idea!
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  6. bassmeknik

    bassmeknik

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    Fair Haven, MI
    Interesting idea, If you look at modern studio monitor designs they are rounding over the front edges to minimize the front baffle area. I believe that is only helpful with higher frequencies however so although your idea would work I'm not sure it would have any measurable benefit over most squarish or rectangular boxes used for woofers.
  7. David1234

    David1234

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    Sydney, Australia
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    Rectangles will always be easier to stack in the van. But however impractical, something round could certainly be cool!
  8. Jeff Roller

    Jeff Roller Jeff Roller Gold Supporting Member

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    Maryville, TN
    I've seen this topic covered before in the past, someone has tried it.....

    The biggest drawback I see for the hobby builder is walking into Home Depot or Lowe's looking for board footage in pi...
  9. superjesus

    superjesus Supporting Member

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    Oct 5, 2006
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    St. Louis, MO
    A rectangular prism maximizes volume for a given area of square footage more so than non-rectangular shapes.
  10. bassmeknik

    bassmeknik

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    Nov 6, 2009
    Location:
    Fair Haven, MI

    +1 indeed it would be :cool:
  11. esa372

    esa372 Supporting Member

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    Aug 7, 2010
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    Los Angeles, CA
    Here are a few quotes from someone who knows what he's doing:

    From http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f15/what-best-cab-shape-876297/


    From http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f15/abnormally-shaped-speaker-cabinets-426995/
  12. T-Bird

    T-Bird

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    Apr 29, 2007
    Location:
    Finland (Northern Europe)
    Hi.


    There's been a few spherical speakers over the years, but as the sphere is -in the speaker enclosure design POV anyway- among the worst, those have been very short lived in MI field.

    Regards
    Sam
  13. dspellman

    dspellman

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    It's come up, but it's an inefficient use of external space for a given internal cabinet space. In short, it's going to take up a lot more space on the back seat of your Honda Civic.
  14. bassmeknik

    bassmeknik

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    Fair Haven, MI
    Thinking about it geometrically, the diameter of a spherical cab would be larger than a single side of any similar volume cube for a given volume, so just getting it through doors could be a problem. This also means you could only use drivers that can perform well in small enclosures.
  15. Passinwind

    Passinwind Charlie Escher Supporting Member

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    Follow the links here to see one aspect of why cab shape does in fact matter. ;)
  16. chadds

    chadds

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    Mar 18, 2000
    Then your drummer would have company when it was time to roll around inside the van.
  17. 1958Bassman

    1958Bassman

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    The rounded edges reduces diffraction of the sound and the problems this causes. Narrow baffles need special compensation in the crossover in order to minimize that effect, too.

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