Can a cabinet construction affect note volume?

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by Arch1Bass, Feb 22, 2014.


  1. Arch1Bass

    Arch1Bass

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2013
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Looking for insight on whether a cabinet can resonate in such away that the volume level of a particular note decreases in relation to all other notes.

    I am presently trying out a GK MB210-II. What I have noticed in my testing of the GK is that when I play the "D" on the A string I seem to lose clarity of tone and volume punch compared to the surrounding notes. Is this a cabinet issue as I don't hear this difference in my present GenzBenz Intro 50 which has a 12" speaker.
  2. DukeLeJeune

    DukeLeJeune Only immortal for a limited time Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Location:
    Preston, Idaho
    Disclosures:
    Owner & designer, AudioKinesis; Auth. mfg, Big E (Home Audio only)
    There are several possible causes for a cab to drop a note in volume relative to the notes around it.

    It could be cancellation from either an internal resonance or a panel resonance that is out-of-phase with the cone.

    It could be related to energy in that region that comes through the port out-of-phase.

    It could originate in the speaker cone itself, or even the speaker surround. At certain frequencies the physical vibration of the cone is reflected back into the cone by the surround, but out-of-phase, so that we have a dip. If you know what to look for, you can usually find this dip in the published frequency response curve.

    It could originate from a reflection off of nearby room boundaries, possibly the floor. You could try raising the cab up off the floor maybe a foot or so and see if that has any effect.

    It could be that the woofer isn't mounted tightly to the front baffle, and that's the frequency where the woofer's frame is feely moving (resonating) out-of-phase with the cone.

    It could be a crossover issue.

    It could be something else that I haven't thought of.

    Sorry this probably doesn't help much. Hopefully someone who has experience with this cab will chime in.
  3. AstroSonic

    AstroSonic Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Location:
    rural New Mexico
    Well, Duke has just about covered the topic. I would just add to try moving around the room while listening, and moving the amp around to check for room modes. Sometimes moving the speakers only a foot or two relative to a room boundary can make a big difference. You may also want to check the same note but at a different location on the neck to make sure that its not a dead spot. Also try an octave higher - should decrease or accentuate the problem. There have ben a lot of posts about the GK combos here, but I don't recall any like this.

    Good luck!
  4. Exploiter8

    Exploiter8 I'm no gynecologist but I'll take a look. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Location:
    Midwest
    Disclosures:
    Commercial FREE!
    Can you try another bass?
  5. Register to disable this ad
  6. DukeLeJeune

    DukeLeJeune Only immortal for a limited time Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Location:
    Preston, Idaho
    Disclosures:
    Owner & designer, AudioKinesis; Auth. mfg, Big E (Home Audio only)
    This one was some of my finest work: "It could be something else that I haven't thought of".
  7. beans-on-toast

    beans-on-toast Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Are you sure it is the cabinet? If not, try another bass into the same cabinet and see what happens. It could be that the 210 is revealing a problem that exists but isn't apparent through the Intro 50.

    Some basses have uneven volume levels depending on the note played. You can have dead notes where the volume is lost, or resonant notes that are louder than others and can even cause feedback. Sometimes this can be fixed by adjusting the pickups or changing strings.
  8. brainburst

    brainburst

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Location:
    bronx ny
    To determine if it is the cabinet or not play the same exact note on other strings, as well as experimenting with cabinet placement.
    The smaller the room, the more evenly spaced the walls, the more likely standing wave cancellation is a culprit.
  9. Arch1Bass

    Arch1Bass

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2013
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    I appreciate all the input and will be doing some testing tomorrow. Will give an update on my findings.
  10. Downunderwonder

    Downunderwonder

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Some basses have dead spots.

Share This Page