Clearcoating a walnut stained body

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by lovethegrowl, Jan 7, 2014.


  1. lovethegrowl

    lovethegrowl

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Location:
    Landers, Ca
    I really do appreciate the advise I got regarding removal of sunburst paint on my SX fretless bass. I will use aircraft paint remover & a rubber squeegee before sanding, then staining the bass walnut. Will one 16 oz. Aerosol can be enough?

    If you don't have an airgun, what's the best way to get an even satin or semigloss coating over a walnut stained body? What's the best substance? I have always had poor luck spraying polyurethane on stuff. Not that hard a protective substance. Doesn't brushing leave visible brush marks?

    Also, I don't think I will easily find a cheap black replacement pick guard for a 30" scale Jazz bass. Will probably have to paint black the existing white pick guard (& the chrome strip over the electronics). Thank God for these new paints that can coat anything including plastic. Is there a good glossy protective coating for black paint?
     
  2. lovethegrowl

    lovethegrowl

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Location:
    Landers, Ca
    Also, before spraying on aircraft paint remover, guess I am gonna have to take out that rear pickup. That stuff will probably eat right through masking tape and the plastic housing of the pickup and mess it up, right?
     
  3. Major Softie

    Major Softie

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    Sep 23, 2011
    Location:
    South Lake Tahoe, CA
    The plastic is probably resistant to the chemical, but why tempt fate? Besides, you'll never get all the stripper out from around the pickup. Definitely take it off.

    Finishes like Deft are available in rattle cans. Some finishes will brush pretty well, and then you can flatten them wet sanding with a sanding block to remove any remaining brush marks.

    The key variable with finishes is drying time. The longer it is, the more time for it to flow out, but the more time there is for dust, insects, etc., to get into the wet finish.
     
  4. kohntarkosz

    kohntarkosz Banned

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    Oct 29, 2013
    Location:
    Edinburgh - Scotland
    I've had good luck with Rustins Plastic Coating. You brush this stuff on heavy then work back until you get a level surface.

    I don't like aerosols, largely because the Scottish climate makes spraying them pretty tricky. That is just my personal preference.

    Have you looked at Tru Oil?

    Lastly, practice on scrap! Stain some scrap wood and try out any potential clear coat on that, because you might find that one reacts badly to the other.
     
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  6. lovethegrowl

    lovethegrowl

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
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    Landers, Ca
    I have worked with deft before. It is definitely the most even spraying lacquer I have ever used. Yeah, I forgot, lacquer can be sanded smooth & glossy, whereas polyurethane turns cloudy white when sanded.

    Sorry, not sure what is meant by "working back" after brushing on heavily. But, come to think of it a stain doesn't always need a plastic coating. Maybe oil (& or wax will be better). I do sweat around my right wrist profusely. Maybe I should look into true oil. I know English furniture makers use layers of buffed wax over stain.

    What will need a plastic coating is the painted pick guard, the paint will certainly tend to scratch off.

    Now my biggest concern is the maple fret board. I will use Fat or Hibeam. Stainless steel. That will soon wear through the existing clear coat & right into the wood in time ( if I don't coat it periodically). That might be tricky finding something comparable with the existing clear coat.
     
  7. kohntarkosz

    kohntarkosz Banned

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    Oct 29, 2013
    Location:
    Edinburgh - Scotland
    The fingerboard could be sanded back to the wood and then epoxied. Ebay has radius blocks for good prices, and there is at least one good step-by-step tutorial on here about using epoxy.

    As for Rustins Plastic Coating (RPC), it is weird stuff. Brian May used it on his guitar. It is a cold-cure two part mix that you have to make in batches. You don't sand between coats unless you allow one coat to dry too long, at which point you have to sand the surface to provide a key. The stuff lathers on thick! You then sand it back to a level surface. Because it goes on with a brush, you have a lot of peaks to level off. I have an alder body kicking around that I stained then put RPC on. I never finished off levelling the RPC coat because it was taking forever, but the one section I did complete looked great.
     
  8. lovethegrowl

    lovethegrowl

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Location:
    Landers, Ca
    Sorry, I meant finding something compatible with the SX clear coat, as some with remain on the fretboard as it wears off. I know Fender uses polyethalene (or nylon) not polyurethane as a clear coat. Who knows what SX uses!
     
  9. lovethegrowl

    lovethegrowl

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Location:
    Landers, Ca
    Another correction, Fender uses polyester.
     
  10. kohntarkosz

    kohntarkosz Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2013
    Location:
    Edinburgh - Scotland
    Just sand off whatever SV uses if it is being attacked by roundwounds. Radius the board when you get to bare wood. Chances are you will do a better job than SX did as you can focus on one neck all day long. :ninja:
     
  11. pfox14

    pfox14

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2013
    I use a lot of rattle can lacquer. I have actually discovered that Rust-O-Leum clear lacquer works really well. I get it at Home Depot.
     

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