Does this mean that it is time to buy a compression pedal? Help needed!

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by jfh2424, Mar 18, 2014.


  1. jfh2424

    jfh2424

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec Canada
    Hello fellow TBers! I’ve found that the notes on the G string of my bass are almost inaudible when I play rock or blues stuff with the band. They sound fine when I am playing at home alone. With the band, however, I can get the same notes higher on my D or A strings, they ring out fine, but not on the G string. I imagine that I am having a hard time hearing these notes because of the mass of the G string that is lower than the mass of the D or A strings.

    This is getting really annoying. I guess one way to do deal with this is to play up the E string and basically only play on the E, A and D string. But that seems kinda of stupid.

    Would buying a higher mass G string also help? My strings right now are Fender® USA Bass 7250ML, NPS, (.045-.100 Gauges)

    Would some kind of compression help in something like this? How would the pedal recognize that the high C needs to be boosted on the G string but not the A or D string?

    Any comments would be really appreciated!

    John
  2. jumblemind

    jumblemind I also answer to Bryan Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    Location:
    Knoxville
    Sounds inline with a pickup spacing/string height issue. What is your bass? Could you post a pic so we can see your setup?
  3. Nephilymbass

    Nephilymbass Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Location:
    Fayetteville Ft Bragg NC
    A pickup hieght adjustment can sometimes fix this.
  4. jfh2424

    jfh2424

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec Canada
    Hello! The bass in question is Roadworn Fender Precision. However, I have had this problem on my 8 other basses too.

    The RW has a pro setup. I think the setup is really good.

    This problem doesn't exist when I play it outside the band because the G string notes don't compete with frequencies from electric guitarists. But in the band, they do.

    If the high C on the G string can't get through but the high C on the D string can, it must be the G string that is the problem, not the note. The question I have is whether this has something to do specifically with the mass of the G string that is different than the D string or whether it is something else.

    In a live rock setting, do you guys find that your G string notes ring out as much as those on the other strings?

    Thanks!

    John
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  6. KellyM

    KellyM

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2006
    Location:
    Lynnwood, WA
    Wow, this is hard to answer without knowing a bit more, but it sounds as if this is a consistent problem with nearly all your basses. If this is indeed the case, my first suspect would be amplification, second would be technique. Or it could be neither. I might be able to pinpoint the problem if you provide more information.
  7. nshuman

    nshuman Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2012
    Location:
    Montreal, Qc, Canada

    If it is just in a band setting, it would point more toward EQing and volumes for you and every instrument involved. Maybe compression could help, hard to tell without knowing what has been tried vis-à-vis EQing everyone involved.

    I see you are in Montreal. If you have any doubt about setup or strings, just bring it to MF.
  8. eveilleu

    eveilleu Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Location:
    Montreal, Qc
    MF ?
  9. nshuman

    nshuman Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2012
    Location:
    Montreal, Qc, Canada

    http://www.mf.qc.ca

    One of the best luthiers in MTL in my very humble opinion.
  10. eveilleu

    eveilleu Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Location:
    Montreal, Qc
    Merci!

    I'm taking my bass and my son's guit there Saturday !
  11. eddododo

    eddododo Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Im a bit of a compression champion, BUT NEVER TO 'SOLVE' ISSUES. because that's what compression is bad at .. solving problems.

    Sounds like an eq/amp issue. At practice (not alone in bedroom) set your amp/eq flat and re-evaluate. Do you use Light gauge strings and/or a 35'' bass? ThIs can also wimpyfy a g string
  12. bassgod0dmw

    bassgod0dmw Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2007
    Location:
    White Plains
    Sounds like P bass dead spots to me. It's a pretty well known issue with decent info in the basses forum.

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