Dorian scale - notation bother

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Nick303, Mar 12, 2014.


  1. Nick303

    Nick303

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    This is quite basic stuff probably but check out this pic;
    [​IMG]
    It clearly shows;
    C D E F G A B C
    Now, I thought C Dorian was;
    C D Eb F G A Bb C
    There's a big hole in my understanding here, it's definitely to do with my reading ability rather than playing ability. Can anyone clear this up for me?
     
  2. Winoman

    Winoman

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    Is there a Bb and an Eb in the key signature, at the beginning of the score? That should explain both the Cm7 (over score) & C Dorian (under score) annotations.
     
  3. elgecko

    elgecko

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    Are there two flats at the beginning of the staff?
     
  4. bass geetarist

    bass geetarist Supporting Member

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    Is the key signature indicated at the beginning? If it shows a flat symbol on the b and e notes at the start of the measure or passage (my terminology may be off here, but I hope this still makes sense) then every b and e will be flat unless otherwise indicated.
     
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  6. Nick303

    Nick303

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    Yes there are, 2 flats. On the B and E lines.. oh ok, this is new to me. Well kind of. Can you explain this to me a bit more fully?
     
  7. Nick303

    Nick303

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    Just saw this post. Yes there is, but I don't fully understand it.
     
  8. Matthew_84

    Matthew_84

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    It means the B and E are flatted notes. In this case it will only be played different if the note is accompanied with a sharp (#) or natural (♮) sign.

    EDIT TO ADD: Typically, there is only one new sign per measure though. So if the first E in a measure is followed by a natural sign, and then there is another E in the same measure without any sign accompanying it, that E will also be a natural not a flat. However, in most cases if in the next measure there is an E without a sign accompanying it, it will likely be an E flat again.
     
  9. john m

    john m Supporting Member

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    It's noted at the beginning of each line (or some times each section of a song) so the accidentals don't have to be written each time. Saves clutter.
     
  10. Nick303

    Nick303

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    Ok cool, then what happens if there are more or less flats at the beginning?
     
  11. Nick303

    Nick303

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    Sorry john m, post crossover.
     
  12. elgecko

    elgecko

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    Then those notes would also be "flatted". They would remain so until the end of the song unless they were cancelled out by a natural sign or by a new key signature.
     
  13. Nick303

    Nick303

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    Ok cheers, I think I get it. Thanks for your help.
     
  14. bass geetarist

    bass geetarist Supporting Member

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    It's been awhile since i've studied theory or read from sheet music, so i may not be the best to explain this, but here goes... Those two flats are indicating the key signature. They are telling you to play EVERY e and b flat, UNLESS a natural symbol (#) appears next to the note, or the key signature changes.
     
  15. Nick303

    Nick303

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    So all E's and B'a are flatted, including octaves higher or lower?
    I'm guessing yes.
     
  16. Matthew_84

    Matthew_84

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    yup... Unless otherwise noted of course
     
  17. Mushroo

    Mushroo

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    The key signature of Bb and Eb tells us we are in the "key" of Bb major. (And confirmed by the photograph: "modes in Bb")

    One way to learn scales is called "solfege": do re mi fa sol la ti do

    There is a famous song from "Sound of Music" called "Do-Re-Mi" that is very good for learning the major scale. In your C Dorian example above, C is the "re" (as in "ray, a drop of golden sun") or 2nd note of the Bb major scale. :)

    Yes.
     
  18. elgecko

    elgecko

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    Correct...also, a natural would cancel out a flat for the entire measure.
     
  19. Nick303

    Nick303

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    All good.
    And my eyes and ears are now working in perfect harmon(ic minor). ;•)
     
  20. davidhilton

    davidhilton Supporting Member

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    It's in the key signature bro.
    www.basslessonslosangeles.com
     
  21. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

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    I still need a little help with SN. So the first thing I do with a new score is to add the sharps and or flats with a number 2 pencil. Just makes things easier.
     

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