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Dorian scale - notation bother

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Nick303, Mar 12, 2014.


  1. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013
    This is quite basic stuff probably but check out this pic;
    [​IMG]
    It clearly shows;
    C D E F G A B C
    Now, I thought C Dorian was;
    C D Eb F G A Bb C
    There's a big hole in my understanding here, it's definitely to do with my reading ability rather than playing ability. Can anyone clear this up for me?
     
  2. Winoman

    Winoman

    May 15, 2005
    Vienna, VA
    Is there a Bb and an Eb in the key signature, at the beginning of the score? That should explain both the Cm7 (over score) & C Dorian (under score) annotations.
     
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  4. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    Are there two flats at the beginning of the staff?
     
  5. bass geetarist

    bass geetarist

    Jul 29, 2013
    toronto
    Is the key signature indicated at the beginning? If it shows a flat symbol on the b and e notes at the start of the measure or passage (my terminology may be off here, but I hope this still makes sense) then every b and e will be flat unless otherwise indicated.
     
  6. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013

    Yes there are, 2 flats. On the B and E lines.. oh ok, this is new to me. Well kind of. Can you explain this to me a bit more fully?
     
  7. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013

    Just saw this post. Yes there is, but I don't fully understand it.
     
  8. It means the B and E are flatted notes. In this case it will only be played different if the note is accompanied with a sharp (#) or natural (♮) sign.

    EDIT TO ADD: Typically, there is only one new sign per measure though. So if the first E in a measure is followed by a natural sign, and then there is another E in the same measure without any sign accompanying it, that E will also be a natural not a flat. However, in most cases if in the next measure there is an E without a sign accompanying it, it will likely be an E flat again.
     
  9. john m

    john m Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2006
    It's noted at the beginning of each line (or some times each section of a song) so the accidentals don't have to be written each time. Saves clutter.
     
  10. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013
    Ok cool, then what happens if there are more or less flats at the beginning?
     
  11. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013
    Sorry john m, post crossover.
     
  12. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    Then those notes would also be "flatted". They would remain so until the end of the song unless they were cancelled out by a natural sign or by a new key signature.
     
  13. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013
    Ok cheers, I think I get it. Thanks for your help.
     
  14. bass geetarist

    bass geetarist

    Jul 29, 2013
    toronto
    It's been awhile since i've studied theory or read from sheet music, so i may not be the best to explain this, but here goes... Those two flats are indicating the key signature. They are telling you to play EVERY e and b flat, UNLESS a natural symbol (#) appears next to the note, or the key signature changes.
     
  15. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013

    So all E's and B'a are flatted, including octaves higher or lower?
    I'm guessing yes.
     
  16. yup... Unless otherwise noted of course
     
  17. The key signature of Bb and Eb tells us we are in the "key" of Bb major. (And confirmed by the photograph: "modes in Bb")

    One way to learn scales is called "solfege": do re mi fa sol la ti do

    There is a famous song from "Sound of Music" called "Do-Re-Mi" that is very good for learning the major scale. In your C Dorian example above, C is the "re" (as in "ray, a drop of golden sun") or 2nd note of the Bb major scale. :)

    Yes.
     
  18. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    Correct...also, a natural would cancel out a flat for the entire measure.
     
  19. Nick303

    Nick303

    Jun 9, 2013
    All good.
    And my eyes and ears are now working in perfect harmon(ic minor). ;•)
     
  20. It's in the key signature bro.
    www.basslessonslosangeles.com
     
  21. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

    I still need a little help with SN. So the first thing I do with a new score is to add the sharps and or flats with a number 2 pencil. Just makes things easier.
     



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