Down Syndrome Boy and Dog

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by MEKer, Jan 11, 2013.


  1. MEKer

    MEKer Supporting member

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    I have a Down Syndrome boy who is the light our our family. Our dog, Ringo (who died last year) treated our boy in the same way. He showed loving respect to him, knowing there was something innocent and vulnerable in him---truly amazing. It was awesome and beyond words. This video can break you up.
     
  2. two fingers

    two fingers Loud Mouth Know It All Blowhard Gold Supporting Member

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    That is bar none the sweetest thing I have seen in a while. To say that the dog understood something about your son is an understatement. The patients and gentle demeanor of Ringo is beyond words. Adorable kid too. A couple of my best friends have a Down Syndrome daughter. I can't wait to show them this. I would email them a link but I want to see the look on their faces when they see it.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
  3. MEKer

    MEKer Supporting member

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    Please understand the video is NOT of MY boy and Ringo, if that is what you thought. It is someone else. But boy can I relate to it as we saw the same thing between our son and our Ringo. Truly it fills your heart to see such a thing. And yes, it is about the sweetest thing you can see.
     
  4. two fingers

    two fingers Loud Mouth Know It All Blowhard Gold Supporting Member

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    Ah. Sorry I got confused. But if you witnessed something even close to that in person, you got a very special gift.
     
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  6. pflash4001

    pflash4001

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    I'm a teacher and have several friends who are special ed teachers. I'm convinced after watching them interact with their kids that God has a special place reserved for those who work with these kids and their families in heaven. I've never dealt with the challenges faced by families affected by this, but my love and respect go out to you guys for all that you do for your son. It's obvious how much you care for him. Watching the understanding and connection when that boy and that pooch made eye contact at 1:20 made it hard not to get misty eyed. Animals sometimes understand things in ways we people are unable to. God bless you guys and I hope you can find a dog who can fill the gap left by your dog's passing when the time is right.
     
  7. Illini10

    Illini10 Supporting Member

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    My youngest son has Down syndrome. He's actually laying on my back as I type this. I've seen this video and I think it is pretty cute. Our cat and dog like being with Adam and he is very sweet to them.

    I just wanted to say that when referring to people with DS it is best to take a "person first" approach. Instead of saying "Down syndrome boy" say "boy with Down syndrome." Down syndrome doesn't define them, they're people first.

    (Stepping off soapbox.)
     
  8. ShredderMaximus

    ShredderMaximus

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    My mom raises puppies for Canine Companions and is on her third puppy now. Back when I was still nearby my mom, I would often take the dog out for walks or take it to the store with me, and upon seeing the puppy wearing its tiny little service dog cape, people would always ask how we could bear to give them up, and with our first puppy, A Black Lab puppy named Raven, we weren't really sure.

    Fast-forward to 18 months later and the dreaded day finally came to give her back. She had become a part of our family and dropping her off hurt. Fast-forward months and months later and we were at her graduation, where we got to see her one more time, since we knew the family that was taking her actually lived across the country in New Jersey which initially bummed us all out a bit.

    Once the ceremony started, they started playing little clips of the matchmaking and training process that she had been going through over that last month, and we all lost it. I forgot what the particular disease the boy had, but it had severely limited his mobility/motor skills, and, to an extent, his mental development. But the look of love in his and our Ray-Ray's (my nickname for her) eyes was the most touching thing I have ever witnessed in my entire life. Watching them go through there training/bonding exercises was like they had been best friends forever, and it was hard thinking that this was the dog who once had an affinity for running toilet paper through the house whenever the opportunity arose.

    It was then when we realized that she had a much higher purpose than just being our pet. She was this boys new life companion and best friend. That is when it stopped hurting so much when thinking we may never see her again, and why today I'm still proud to say I was part of that. There really is something amazing about dogs that give them the capacity for compassion that I think is unmatched in the rest of the animal kingdom, and I think your video really shows that. You can tell, the dog in the video isn't looking for a treat, or really even a scratch behind the ear, its love and understanding for the child, and is the reason the entire time I've been writing this I've been holding back tears.

    I didn't get as much of a chance to spend time with their second puppy Glenna and have been in out here in Texas since they got their third Fergie, but heres a pic of me and our TP bandit, Ray-Ray:

    [​IMG]
     

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