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Dunlop Dual Design locks not workimg in basswood

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by el_cody_loco, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. el_cody_loco

    el_cody_loco

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    Disclaimer: I've been playing for years, but technologically, I'm a novice.

    I bought a Vintage Modified series Squier Bass, and I like it. HOWEVER, when installimg Dunlop Dual Design strap lock pins, the screws dont fit very well. The pin in the upper horn seems to be a little hard to screw in all the way, and the pin in the bottom ofnthe body is spinning, despite me tightening it as much as I can.

    This is the first bass with a basswood body that I've put these locks on, and since I've had no issues with other Fenders or even Gibsons of other tone woods like Alder and Mahogany, I'm wonderimg if basswood is unfortunately not good for this, or if I just don't know what I'm doing. Any advice would be immensely helpful :)
  2. hdracer

    hdracer Supporting Member

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    Just put some wax on the screw first and use a GOOD screwdriver that fits the screw properly.
  3. floydman

    floydman Supporting Member

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    this is not an issue with the type of wood. the one that is spinning as been stripped out. there is no wood left to hold the screw tight. this is easily fixed by toothpicks and wood glue. get a few toothpicks and trim to length so they don't stick out beyond the body of that stripped hole. take them back out from this dry fit and now coat in wood glue, push back in and let sit overnight to dry. You may need to redrill a pilot hole at this point or the screw may be too tight just like the other one. choose a drill size equal or slightly smaller to the minor diameter on the screw. hold the drill up to the screw and make sure the drill is not wider than the solid portion of the screw. you can use the same drill to put a pilot hole in the other spot where the screw is too tight.
  4. cheapimitation

    cheapimitation

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    The pin that is spinning means that the hole is stripped. You can fix this by removing it and swabbing or adding drops of superglue into the hole (while the hole is empty), and letting it dry. This should make a fresh, harder surface for the screw to grab.
  5. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

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    As far as the lower strap button: jam some toothpicks and wood glue into the screw hole, snip flush with whatever, and then screw the strap button back into place while the glue is still wet. Problem solved.

    Upper strap button: check the screw hole for depth and compare with what's actually required. You may have to deepen or otherwise modify the pilot hole. Some resistance is to be expected but, if encountering an inordinately high degree of resistance, there's a good chance you can snap the screw. As hdracer pointed out, you should pre-lube the screw threads with wax, bar soap, etc. Sidenote: my wife stashes those candles-in-a-glass jar thingys around the house in case of emergencies (power outages, etc). I just jam the screws in the nearest jar. She hasn't yelled at me ...yet.

    Riis
  6. Blake Bass

    Blake Bass Supporting Member

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    I love Dunlops, I have been using them for about 20 years.. I have had to drill the hole a little deeper on every bass I have installed them on. Also the toothpick suggestion works really well.
  7. joeyl

    joeyl Supporting Member

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    I use a toilet wax ring to lube screws, works awesome. Toilet wax ring is new in box of course.
  8. bswag

    bswag Not a Real Bass Player Supporting Member

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    floydman has it right; I've had to do the same. Follow his instruc. to the letter, and lube the screws with a bit of bar soap. Just be sure you let the glue dry well. If toothpicks are too chintzy for ya, get an itty-bitty hardwood dowel at the hardware store instead and use that. Whittle with a pocketknife if need be.
    Blake Bass is also right, the Dunlop screws are always longer, so drill accordingly.
  9. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

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    Negative. Jam the screw in while the glue is still wet, that's why the process works. The compression of the screw causes the strands to separate and, as a result, the fibers conform to the inner wall. If done properly, you can remove the screw and not detect any sign of a repair.

    Super glue, Gorilla glue, and JB Weld are not suitable alternatives...although I did experiment once with JB Weld...and only once.

    Riis
  10. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    To add to this, make sure they are hardwood tooth picks and not bamboo.
  11. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

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    ...and not those little plastic swords they use for cocktail olives.

    I've done field repairs with sandwich toothpicks: you know, the ones with cellophane tassels designed to keep your Reuben aligned.

    Riis
  12. fhm555

    fhm555 So FOS my eyes are brown Supporting Member

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    Yeppers, do NOT allow the glue to dry when doing the toothpicks and glue fix. Doing so defeats the purpose of this method as the idea is to reform the toothpicks to fit the screw and use the glue to fill in any empty spots left when this happens.

    Allowing the glue to dry before running in the screw will result in a weak hold on the screw and a bunch of cracked dry glue in the bottom of the hole.

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