1. Welcome to TalkBass, the Premier Bass Player Community and Information Source. Register a 100% Free Account to post and unlock tons of features.

Dutch or Tung Oil for neck/body finish?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by CID Vicious, Mar 5, 2014.


  1. I have two projects going on that call for an oil finish. One is reshaping a Bronze Series BC Rich Warlock (both body and neck will be oiled) and refinishing a SBMM SUB SB4's neck to be more US EBMM in feel.

    I did a refinish on my other Warlock - body's top and the neck sanded to bare wood, top stained with a gun stock style stain and then body and neck were rubbed with Dutch Oil.

    I like the Dutch Oil's finish, and was a bit easier to work with than Tung Oil I've used on earlier projects. Plus it's about half the cost.

    Are there any good reasons to pony up for the Tung over the Dutch?

    I REALLY like the feel of EBMM necks. So is there something better than either of these for 'that' feel?

    Thanks in advance. Did a search in this forum but nothing came up.

    Always rather ask the knowledgeable than attempt to reinvent the wheel..
     
  2. Triad

    Triad Supporting Member

    Jul 4, 2006
    Europe
    Disclosures:
    Luthier
    I guess you mean "Danish oil", not Dutch? ;)
    Anyway, the Danish oil usually contains oil (like Tung oil but less refined) and a few chemicals that make it dry quicker/better. The recipe can change a lot, though, and so the results.
    I make my own Danish oil but I was pretty happy with Colron recipe (apart from the tendency to yellow the woods a lot).
     
  3. TalkBass Friendly Advertisement


    to hide this ad and more.
  4. Cool, yeah, I had to toss the remainder of it and don't have the can anymore. Probably fighting words "Ah...the Dutch" :D

    So no big drawbacks to going with the Danish oil then? I do notice that if you want gloss it's probably going to come sooner with the Tung, but I prefer matte/wood feel.

    Thanks for the reply.
     
  5. Triad

    Triad Supporting Member

    Jul 4, 2006
    Europe
    Disclosures:
    Luthier
    They have similar effects but of course the Danish oil could be darker and yellow the wood more. It also dries faster and builds a thicker film with less coats. If you want a glossy look you'll have to use it in multiple coats and then polish it but it's not a real varnish so it won't be super-shiny.
     



Share This Page