1. Welcome to TalkBass, the Premier Bass Player Community and Information Source. We've been uniting the Low End Since 1998!

    We're glad you've found us. Register a 100% Free Account to post and unlock tons of features.

EB-0 mudbucker

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by JimmyM, Mar 30, 2014.


  1. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    After seeing that kid Pete O'Hanlon in The Strypes laying waste to the low end with an old Epiphone Rivoli and an SVT-CL/810e, I believe it has finally inspired me to restore that old 1960 Gibson EB-0 I have out in the garage, and that project starts Tuesday. But when I bought it, someone replaced the mudbucker with a DiMarzio Model One, and I want a real mudbucker, not some cleaned up version of one.

    Unfortunately, EMG doesn't make a mudbucker replacement yet, so that leaves either coping with new mudbuckers which I find quite inferior or paying out the wazoo for an old one, which I'd rather not do. The big mudbucker names that get thrown around here are Novak and Artec. And from what I'm reading, the Novak actually does a pretty good job at recreating the magic and does it better than the Artec, but dang, those Artecs are inexpensive.

    So not being someone who wants to spend even a cent more than I have to, I'll call on you all who have tried both to give me your opinions. I'll also ask for other recommendations if you have any. TIA!
     
  2. ctmullins

    ctmullins Registered thumper Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    MS Gulf Coast
    Wow. Those two are like Lada and Bentley. Sure, the Artec is cheap, but it's well liable to reach you wired incorrectly from the factory (there's a thread around here somewhere), and it'll be up to you to make it work. And even then it'll sound like mud.

    Curtis Novak, on the other hand, is a real person who is willing to listen to your stated tonal goals, and will wind you a pickup with that tone in mind, and it'll be a beautiful work of art and will reach your doorstep within a few weeks.

    When people start talking about cheap pickups, my standard answer is "if you buy cheap pickups, you'll get cheap pickups". Personally, it's no longer worth my time to go down that dead-end alley; I've been disappointed one too many times.
     
  3. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    Every now and then, though, you run into a good cheap pickup. For example, the SX P pickups...the polepieces are way too high but it sounds pretty good considering it comes on a bass that costs slightly over $100. Was hoping Artecs might be a diamond in the rough, too. Did see some stuff on the net about incorrect wiring from the factory, however, and you're corroborating, so that tells me that the Artec is not.
     
  4. ctmullins

    ctmullins Registered thumper Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    MS Gulf Coast
    In case you haven't yet visited Novak's site, he makes three different mudbucker replacements. One is a traditional sidewinder (but can be wound to your specs). One is a "normal" side-by-side humbucker that looks like a mudbucker (the EB-AA, if I recall). One is a big single-coil, similar to a BiSonic, made to look like a mudbucker (the EB-BS). And in addition, he now makes BiSonic/DarkStar replicas too.

    Lots of choices. I actually replaced an Artec mudbucker (even after fixing the wiring) with a Novak EB-BS, and was not disappointed. :)
     
  5. Register to disable this ad
  6. bassclef112

    bassclef112

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2003
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    Though I'm sure Novak makes great stuff, personally I would look for an original on ebay - they do come around and there's one up now that's in the Novak price range. Make an offer.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1966-Gibson...g-/161260651847?pt=Guitar&hash=item258be24547

    Put this in and you'll never wonder how close you got.

    P.S. +1 on cheap pickups. You might get lucky, but the general rule of crap in crap out almost always rings true. Especially since you can't try it out first.
     
  7. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    Dang it...wish I could do it today. I'd probably pop it if finances were a little better right now.
     
  8. TN WOODMAN

    TN WOODMAN

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Location:
    Smyrna, Tennessee.
    Jimmy , check back with seller when ready, Mike E is a legend around my parts for having cool, hard to find vintage gear priced right .
     
  9. Roscoe East

    Roscoe East

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2011
    :rollno:
     
  10. petrus61

    petrus61 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    Jimmy, when I modded an old P bass to have a mudbucker, I found an authentic early 70's Gibson for about $90 on fleabay. This was a few years ago so Im not sure what they're going for now, but they can be had.
     
  11. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    Is that a problem for you, Roscoe?
     
  12. Roscoe East

    Roscoe East

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2011
    Not a "problem", I'm just amused by the complete 180° reversal of conventional wisdom (sic) from back when I used Gibson mudbuckers.

    Had a 60s EB-0 when I was a teenager in the 70s, and thought they were horribly farty indistinct sounding instruments...and at that time I couldn't find another bassist who disagreed with me. So when the DiMarzio Model 1 arrived on the scene it was like a godsend, and every bassist I knew of with an EB-series bass (including the guy who wound up with my EB-0, since I'd gotten rid of it) replaced their original Gibson mudbucker with a DiMarzio.

    ...because they all wanted a "cleaned up version".

    Just didn't expect I'd ever see that trend reverse.
     
  13. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    That is very true, Roscoe. I bought that bass in 1979 and that was, indeed, the thinking. And to be honest, that was a selling point to me when I got it. But times change, and what's old is new again. I think what triggered the return to mudbuckers was Jack Bruce playing an EB-1 on the Cream reunion shows a few years back. I think folks started thinking that though the pickup was farty, it was a good kind of farty, and if you just let it be what it is and don't try to make it into something it's not, it's a pretty usable sound for some types of music. It could never be my #1 bass, but it could be a nice diversion from my #1 bass.
     
  14. petrus61

    petrus61 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Location:
    Earth
    Exactly my experience with it. It's not really a sound I'd use live, but I've gotten great tone with one in the studio through a B-15.
     
  15. ctmullins

    ctmullins Registered thumper Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    MS Gulf Coast
    I don't have any direct experience, but it occurs to me that perhaps the amplifiers and/or cabinets of yesteryear might be partly to blame for that "farty" reputation.
     
  16. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Location:
    Apopka, FL
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps
    Maybe, but then I heard this clip of the Strypes and their bass player's using an old Rivoli and no mic on the 810e cab, so he has to be running DI and it still sounds pretty broken up. He might be using the CL's gain to make it break up too, but that seems to be the sound of those old Gibsons and Epiphones no matter who's playing them.

    OOPS: Forgot to post the clip:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRs5G5j0SEs
     
  17. Steve Dallman

    Steve Dallman Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2006
    Location:
    East Central Wisconsin
    I would chance the Artec model. I have been using the mudbucker model on my Line 6 quite a lot lately.
     
  18. clanky

    clanky

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2014
    Do original 60's / 70's mudbuckers work the same today? Do they lose strength over the decades? Lose mud? They were crazy strong, for a passive pickup, in their heyday.
     
  19. clanky

    clanky

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2014
    Interestingly, I just saw today that SGD Lutherie (David Schwab) has a mudbucker replacement.
    www.sgd-lutherie.com
     
  20. Tanner5382

    Tanner5382

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Location:
    Canton, GA
    I had one, a '69 or '70, around a month or so back. Would have just sent it to you if I still had it. Sorry dude.
     
  21. Tanner5382

    Tanner5382

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    Location:
    Canton, GA
    And not only that, but it's shipping out next week!
     

Share This Page