Etudes

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by bassmastan, Apr 15, 2014.


  1. bassmastan

    bassmastan

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Location:
    Potsdam,NY
    Hey Guys,

    looking for some etudes to play other than the standard Simandl/Storch-Harabe. I am really looking for musical etudes, something that really sings under the bow. Preferably an etude book but certain ones are cool too.

    Let me know what you guys think!

    Thanks!
    -B
     
  2. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2011
    Try the Vance books...
     
  3. bassmastan

    bassmastan

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Location:
    Potsdam,NY
    Thanks, not looking for a method. More like the Nanny 10 etudes and caprices or proto etudes
     
  4. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2011
    Then look at Mengoli:20 concert studies
     
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  6. bucephylus

    bucephylus Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2002
    I've got Sturm 110 Studies Opus 20 on my stand. They are studies; so, "sing under the bow" is not the way I would describe them. They are interesting.

    If I want something to sing, I play pieces. But, that's just me.
     
  7. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2011
    Can I ask how do you go through the Sturm book (or any other etudes book for that matter) - do you stay on the same piece until such time as you can play almost by memory alone? Previously, it was suggested (rightly or wrongly) that playing a piece, with no mistakes, 10 times in a row is considered the "benchmark" ....

    Thanks for reading!
     
  8. neilG

    neilG

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Location:
    Ventura, CA
    I don't know where the "ten times" benchmark is from, but if you really think about it, if you can play it once through at the level expected, you should move on to something else, lesson learned. If you think it's a fluke, play it a second time. :)
     
  9. bucephylus

    bucephylus Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2002
    There may be several aspects here. I generally think working on a given piece for a week is about right, assuming you are working on other things at the same time. The key is to identify what the skill is that is being taught by a given etude. Of course, a proper teacher can help minimize wasted time and focus on what needs to be gained in the given etude. Figuring it out on your own is much more inefficient and hit or miss. How would you know if you are playing it "flawlessly" if you do not know what technique aspect is the goal? Achieving "perfection" may be somewhat less important than understanding and mastering the skill(s), which is(are) the subject of the etude.

    That said, I have not had a teacher for quite some time. I just do my best, and move from piece to piece when I am satisfied. But, that's me.
     
  10. bassmastan

    bassmastan

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Location:
    Potsdam,NY
    At my college, it isnt uncommon for us to stay on an etude for an entire semester (aprox 15 weeks) for a jury. Is it something I like... nope, is it something that we do... yup. I wanted to find an etude or two that I could really hook onto, so that way when I do have to stay on it for 15 weeks I can not be as bored.

    I agree with the mastering skills aspect, I feel as though its almost like, play it through and make it sound good without direction, even though the etude calls for hooked bowings and extensive 3rd position playings. Teachers do what teachers do though... Im certainly not the expert :)
     
  11. stefaniw80401

    stefaniw80401

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Location:
    Evergreen, Colorado
    Lee 12 studies are lyrical and great for developing musicality and flow.
     

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