Fanned fret bass necks.

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by sebastian, Jan 22, 2008.


  1. sebastian

    sebastian

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    I am going build a parts project and I would like to utilize a fanned fret neck. Is there a supplier?

    Thanks
  2. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Gold Supporting Member

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    Mar 16, 2002
    Location:
    Reims, Champagne, France
  3. sebastian

    sebastian

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    I asked them if they will do five string?
    Novax the only supplier?
  4. erikbojerik

    erikbojerik

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, Maryland
    Probably. You might check with Doug at Soulmate Guitars.

    Otherwise, you'll have to find a luthier.
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  6. sebastian

    sebastian

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    I have viewed the novax site and $550.00 for a neck. I am hoping I can locate a luthier in the mid-west that can make one for a bit less.
    I am curious as to why the neck is worth so much?
  7. Phil Mailloux

    Phil Mailloux

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Disclosures:
    Builder: Mailloux Basses
    If you look at the Warmoth site you'll see most necks run from about $300-400. Making fanned frets is alot more complicated than straight ones, hence the price.
  8. gweimer

    gweimer

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2000
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    It's probably partially due to the fact that it was designed to drop onto a Fender body with little modification. The Novax site even shows how to set the bridge. It's a nice neck, though. I'm having some fun with my Bettie Page bass. I got the Ebony fretboard for an extra $30.
    And my project bass came in cheaper than a new Dingwall by quite a bit.
  9. sebastian

    sebastian

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    Is there rhyme or reason to the calculation of angling the frets?
  10. grace & groove

    grace & groove

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    Nov 30, 2005
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    Self-Appointed Ambassador to the Dragonfly
  11. erikbojerik

    erikbojerik

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    Sep 11, 2005
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, Maryland
    Yeah...if you want it to intontate. Otherwise you end up with a BSO (bass-shaped object).
  12. BobKos

    BobKos

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    It all has to do with scale length. The idea behind the fanned fret system is to have say a 34" scale E while having say a 32" G. Obviously the fret spacing is different between a 34" and a 32". The frets are set up to accomodate the differing scale lengths for a particular instrument. The larger the difference of scale lengths, the more radical the fret wire 'fan'.
  13. Synplicity

    Synplicity

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    Kent, England
    [​IMG]

    for such an expensive neck, the headstock is very ugly
  14. UncleBalsamic

    UncleBalsamic

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    Yeah I never liked the head stocks but you can retrofit them onto a Fender can't you? That is quite cool in my opinion.
  15. sebastian

    sebastian

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    So lets say a five string with a 35" scale on the B how would you calculate the length of the scale for the G string?
    And a yes that is a pretty homely headstock.
  16. gweimer

    gweimer

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2000
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    You might actually be at 35" on the E.

    [​IMG]
  17. sebastian

    sebastian

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada
    Why is that? Would not the B be at 35"?
  18. Jonsbasses

    Jonsbasses

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    Disclosures:
    Builder: Jon's Basses
    Fanned fret = multi scale. Pick your two scales.

    Let's say 35" for the B, 33" for the G. Mark the scale for the B-string, then mark the scale for the G-string and connect the dots. That is completely simplifying it, but how it works.
  19. grace & groove

    grace & groove

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    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
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    Self-Appointed Ambassador to the Dragonfly
    You can choose what you want but usually people use 37" for the B and 32" for the G for the most equal tension.
  20. Dirk Diggler

    Dirk Diggler

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    Location:
    Anytown USA
    I prefer 36 to 32 on my 6 strings. Actually the bridge position is one of the hardest to get right.
    I kind like that look on that P bass too.
    Dirk
  21. SDB Guitars

    SDB Guitars Gold Supporting Member

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    Coeur d'Alene, ID
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    Shawn Ball - Owner, SDB Guitars
    I believe that Dingwall uses 37" on the B and 34" on the G for their standard 5 strings... it's something different on the Super-J...

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