Fingering Certain Harmonic Chords

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by slapfunk987, Mar 24, 2014.


  1. slapfunk987

    slapfunk987

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    Recently bought a copy of Adam Novick's book, Harmonics ForElectric Bass. After looking through I have realized that much of it goes over my head as I do not have much theory knowledge yet.
    But the charts in the back of the book at least give you the fingerings. Question is how do you play these harmonic chords?? Some of them have broken fingerings where all the notes can't be played at once. And some have actual notes, not just harmonics. Do I play every note listed or do I omit some notes completely???
    Here is a snapshot of a page that gives some examples.
    Should be in attachments..
     

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  2. mambo4

    mambo4

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    I would take the diagrams to mean merely "here are the possible chord tones, play then as you like"
     
  3. LeeNunn

    LeeNunn Supporting Member

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    This is a great way to learn a little theory. Take the first example, which is labeled CM7. This stands Cmajor7, which consists of the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th notes of the C major scale. The notes are respectively C, E, G, and B.
    The natural harmonic over the 5th fret on the G string is G, which is the 5th of the CM7 chord. The fifth fret is always an octave of the open string (as is the 12th fret).
    The natural harmonic over the 5th fret on the D string is D, which is the 9th of the CM7 chord (actually making it a CM9 chord).
     
  4. Stick_Player

    Stick_Player

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    This is not correct.

    The FIRST example sounds the "C" (the stopped 3rd fret of the A-String), and the harmonics: B, A, D - on the respective E, D, G strings.

    The chord-tones are actually labeled below each "fret board" diagram: M7, R, 6, 9 (or: B, C, A, D)

    It may be a little misleading to use the label "CM7", but it's more a grouping (chord family) that includes Cmaj7 and the added major 6th and added major ninth.
     
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  6. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

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    We do not play them all at once. We play them one note at a time. AND which ones are let up to you.

    Guitar fingering charts are a little confusing - for me, as an old 6 string guitar guy, in that there is no way my fingers can span those patterns - one of the patterns covers 9 frets. What's a guy to do?

    What is nice to see is the chord tones that are listed below the finger pattern, i.e. R-3-5-6, etc. And Like Mombo4 said; What you do with them is left up to you.

    Remember we do not strum we play the fingering one note at a time. The chart shows us where the notes for that chord are located. Now sound them one note at a time and include as many of the notes as you think are necessary. Yep, roots just by themselves do work. Root and a five work a little better, need more throw in an 8 or the correct 3 or 7...

    Hope that put some light in the tunnel.
     
  7. LeeNunn

    LeeNunn Supporting Member

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    Thanks. I misread the chart.
     

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