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G&L bridge or....

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by gleneg61, Jan 22, 2014.


  1. gleneg61

    gleneg61

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Need some advice. I have an Aria IGB68/5 lefty but the bridge is clearly designed for righty as the lefty B & E strings can't be adjusted back any further so intonation is out markedly. If I played righty strung lefty no probs but the cavity under the bridge makes a normal bridge unusable as their mounting screws are over the cavity, into space. I've searched & the only bridge that seems a work around is the G&L as it has side mounting screws. Any other suggestions or ideas welcome. Thnx
     

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  2. gleneg61

    gleneg61

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    This is the offending bridge on a righty.
     

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  3. gleneg61

    gleneg61

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    G&L bridge with side screws only used when strung thru body, as I would have to use it.
     

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  4. pfox14

    pfox14

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2013
    There should be no difference between a righty and lefty bridge unless it's modular and the individual pieces are not all aligned straight and at the same distance from the nut. You can simply measure the distance from the nut to the 12th fret and double it to determine where the saddle should be (should line up with the center of the travel of the saddle). If it doesn't, then the bridge assembly is in the wrong place which will make intonating the bass impossible. Hope this helps.
     
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  6. gleneg61

    gleneg61

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Hi & thnx for your reply. In 99% of cases you are correct about righty/lefty bridges being the same but in this one, it has a screw which prevents the B & E saddles from moving further away from the nut, making them pull up sharp, which wouldn't be a problem on a righty for the D & G strings as they'd be closer to the nut for correct intonation. It's a weird design, the pic may make it easier to explain. If I move the entire bridge unit back, the B & E saddles will extend beyond the body as the bridge is right at the very end of the body anyway. The screws are part of the substructure & are not removable & to do so the saddles can't be anchored & will simply slide forward. Aargh
     

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  7. 96tbird

    96tbird This Indian movie is really boring man.

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Location:
    Manitoba, Canada
    Is that the stock bridge?

    Have you witnessed the strings when intonating?

    Any bridge can be used. You would just need to carve a filler block of wood to go under it. Not difficult; it wouldn't need to be a perfect fit, just needs to fill most of the cavity a small gap around the edges and corners wouldn't be a problem.
     
  8. gleneg61

    gleneg61

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Hi n thnx for the input. That is the stock bridge & I also thought about filling the cavity as you said, but how to secure the filler block to the body? Mega glue or screws/nails are the only way I guess n it would have to be extremely secure to hold a bridge sturdy with strings pulling it under full tension. I've got no idea what that cavity could be for.
     
  9. gleneg61

    gleneg61

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Hi gents n gals,
    Any advice or ideas on how to fill that cavity with something, bearing in mind that it will be the main point on which a normal bridge would be mounted, would be greatly appreciated. I'd hate to mount the bridge on it & have the string tension rip the bridge & filler block out & kill a fellow muso with a blow to the temple. (Well, if it was a guitard...)
     

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