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Getting a neck glossed.

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by PBnJBassist, Jan 1, 2013.

  1. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    Can anyone recommend me a place/shop that can gloss up a neck for me. It's a Fender fretted 4-string neck. I've never done this before and would rather pay for a professional/experienced person to do it. Also, any idea how much someone would usually charge? I don't mind paying a fair price so as long as it's done right. Just looking for a clear gloss on the entire neck and fretboard.
  2. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member

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    that's a departure!

    folks are always asking about de-glossing the backs of their neck.

    so it's already finished, but just not glossy? or there's no finish on it at all, it's just raw wood?

    also, what's the fretboard made of? that matters, if it's rosewood or maple.
  3. C.Linton

    C.Linton Supporting Member

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    I would like to know this too. I've always thought my Two Squier VMs would be nice with a glossy maple fretboard and neck. Not that there's anything wrong with the poly satin finish, I just like the glossy look.
  4. 96tbird

    96tbird Supporter Supporting Member

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    Hey you an just wax it with carnuba paste wax and elbow grease and get it to shine and slippy-er ( ;) ) than poly. SurferJoe does all his and has posted some pics; awesome results.
  5. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    Yeah. Ths neck has a satin finish the neck is all maple with a maple fretboard. Tried searching but no luck. Of course I would have to pay for the labor of removing any finish on it, but as I said, I won't mind shelling the dough so as long as the job is done right. I really like the neck and glossing it up would make it *that* much more to my absolute preference.

    Also, thanks for the suggestion, but I want a poly gloss neck. Something about glossy necks... I just love them!
  6. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member

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    OK, if it has a satin finish then it would likely just be a matter of sanding and buffing that finish out to fully gloss.
  7. TN WOODMAN

    TN WOODMAN

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    Talk bass first.
  8. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    First time for everything. I thought about shooting Warmoth an email, but I don't know if they would since they're slammed with custom orders. My local luthier is on vacation until January 3rd, so it will be awhile until I can ask. What about guitar restoration places? I've seen some of them restore worn necks that have also lossed their gloss. Anyone have any suggestions?
  9. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

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    Just the mere act of playing the silly thing will, to some degree, gloss a satinized neck.

    Riis
  10. 96tbird

    96tbird Supporter Supporting Member

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    Riis is right. My VMJ has gone from satin to glossy from playing it. So, Walter is also right that it can be buffed to a gloss. But it seems our OP is determined to lay out some cash and get the refinish done.

    The neck will not have to be stripped. Prepping the finish and applying the gloss over it is what will take place. Have at it.

    Here's a pic of SurferJoe's wax job on a neck.

    Attached Files:

  11. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    Yes, I'm determined to have a gloss urethane finish on my neck. Again, thanks for the alternatives, but I just want to know who might be able to provide such services...
  12. Thornton Davis

    Thornton Davis Supporting Member

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    Any good luthier should be able to offer you this service. I had the neck of my Music Man BA-5 finished with a high gloss lacquer a couple of years ago. The cost to have it done was $350.00 which I feel was money well spent.

    TD
  13. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member

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    again, if you already have a poly finish on there, you just need to "finish the job" and shine it up!

    micromesh up through the grades to 12k grit, then hit it with a real buffing wheel, bam! glossy neck.
  14. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    Any buffing wheel you recommend? Was able to talk to my luthier and he said he uses regular wood poly spray on finishes and just buffers them evenly. What he uses can be bought in almost any hardware store for $10 a can and could be used on both unfinished & finished woods of most kinds - so a good buffer suggestion from like Home Depot would be my next starting place. That, and getting junk wood to test this on. Going make this a DIY thing since my luthier said it was easy with a bit of time consumption for taping up the frets and buffing the finish.
  15. JLS

    JLS Supporting Member

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    Disclosures:
    I setup & repair guitars & basses
    I don't think you're getting it; you don't need to add any finish, all you need to do is buff it up to a gloss, or have someone else do it.
  16. PCR

    PCR

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    You don't even need a buffing wheel.

    Micromesh works great. You can find it at most hobby stores.

    But rubbing compound or car wax works great too.

    I just take an old (clean) tube sock, turn it inside out, and rub down the neck with car wax. It takes a few minutes, but it works.

    I just do the back of the neck.
  17. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    I was JUST doing research and this IS what I'm going to do after I go to sleep and wake up. Going to try 2 methods on 2 different spare necks:

    Neck #1 - Rubbing Compound plus a 6" buffing wheel with terry cloth bonnets (recommended on a guitar forum).

    Neck #2 - Using quick-dry spray on gloss polyurethane (three coats should do) and wet-sanding going from 400 > 600 > 800 > 1200 then buffing using method as described on Neck #1 (recommended by my luthier and some random guitar player guy).

    I DO want a gloss finish - but I'm also after that rock-hard candy-like coating like on those glossed Fender necks. Unfortunately, I don't have the pro-tools like Fender, nor the uber poly Fender uses, but #2 is the DIY thing that a guitar player was kind enough to show me what the ending result would turn out to be. Was very surprised and impressed he got that candy-shell-shiny-gloss that I am going for and he applied it on top of satin finished necks. Definitely going to practice this one a few times on some spare wood!
  18. miles'tone

    miles'tone

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    I shined up my Fender American Special neck, which is a very thin satin poly finished neck.
    I simply wet sanded, not too wet mind, with 1500 then 2000 grit wet and dry auto sand paper then got an old t-shirt and polished it with T-cut auto polish ( the type that is used to polish off faded car finish. Then a good rub down with a bit of clean dry t-shirt. Cost me nothing. The finish is like glass and as good as any Geddy Lee necks gloss finish. It really is easy and only took me 2 hours.
    I personally would avoid using 400 - 800 grit as you may find yourself through to bare wood in no time.
  19. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

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    Thanks for that! Hmm... 1500 then 2000 then dry sand paper. Got it! :) Haha! So excited I can't sleep. Might stay up the next 6 hrs or so just to wait for the hardware store to open. :D
  20. C.Linton

    C.Linton Supporting Member

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    He said to use "wet and dry" (that's what it's called) sand paper used wet, not to use wet sandpaper, then use dry sandpaper. Just want to make sure that was clear

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