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Gig priorities.

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by thepontif, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. thepontif

    thepontif

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    Just curious about a consensus here. If you accept a gig on an off night that pays low, and then get an offer for another that pays more, how many of you bail on the lower paying one? And of those who do, how much more must the better gig pay? And do you bother to get a sub?
  2. LeonD

    LeonD Supporting Member

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    Once I accept a gig for pay, I'd stick with it. I might try and find a replacement for the lower paying gig but if I can't, I'd do it.

    It's just the right thing to do.
  3. Mehve

    Mehve

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    If you're serious about gigging in the area, a reputation as a bailer is the last thing you want to encourage. There would hvae to be some fairly significant circumstances surrounding the low-payer before I'd bail (i.e. He blatantly low-balled you on the premise that he knew you wouldn't have any other options).
  4. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito

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    Yep.

    If a sub bails on me for a better paying gig, I can promise you that I'll never hire him again, and I'll spread the word.
  5. smperry

    smperry Moderator Supporting Member

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    moved to band management
  6. thepontif

    thepontif

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    Sorry. Thanks!
  7. thepontif

    thepontif

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    I agree. The only time I bail is if I get a tour or something. Can't turn down $2500 worth of tour for two $100 gigs. But I always at least offer to find a sub, and if its short notice, I get someone in the wings before I make the call to bail. It can be a sticky situation.

    Reason I ask is because I'm playing a gig next week on which two drummers have bailed since it was initially planned. One guy was for a legitimate reason, but the other was simply because he got a better paying gig.
  8. smperry

    smperry Moderator Supporting Member

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    No problem...rereading it, I'm not positive this is the right place, but it's closer.
  9. Kmonk

    Kmonk

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    Once I commit to a gig paid or unpaid ( I do some charity benefits) I do my best to keep it. If I am offered a high paying gig or tour, I will offer to find a replacement for the lower paying gig. Once you get the reputation of bailing on gigs, you lose all credibility and it becomes more difficult to get work.
  10. jmattbassplaya

    jmattbassplaya

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    Depends on the situation as there are a lot of variables to consider. For one, how big/important is this gig vs the other. Are we talking a dinky bar gig or a big festival? Likewise, how great of an opportunity is this gig vs the other one. If I have the chance to hook up and network with some big name cats then that's something I need to do for my own personal benefit. Of course, I wouldn't consider taking on a 'better' gig unless I knew for a fact that I could hook the first band up with a competent sub to take my place, and even then I'd first have to talk with the band leader to make sure they'd be cool with me taking the other gig that is personally better for me. I'd also have to consider how much I need the extra money. If I'm trying to pay rent then money definitely talks, and it talks loudly.
  11. thepontif

    thepontif

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    There's also the thing where, some gigs it NEEDS to be you, and some gigs it really doesn't matter. It's funny how singers in wedding bands often make more than rhythm section guys, but somehow if you have a sub bass player, the event coordinator is going to have a fit.

    If its a performance band with a real audience, it probably matters a lot more.

    But I can name a million bass players who can play "call me maybe" just as well as I can. If I can cover myself with one, I don't feel guilty.
  12. The Diaper Geni

    The Diaper Geni Supporting Member

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    This just happened this week with a drummer sub for my main band. Our regular drummer was out of town and we hired one drummer to fill in the holiday weekend. The sub drummer called two weeks ago to say he got a better paying gig on one of the nights so he bailed on one of the nights. We still used him on the remainder of the gigs, but I told the band leader (the guy who hired the sub) to replace him (the sub drummer) and tell him we got another drummer who would do the gigs for cheaper. We could have, too.

    But the band leader stuck with the original sub.

    If I take I gig I keep it. Unless it's for a series of gigs for great pay or a "career enhancing" gig. Neither of which, at this point in my life, is likely to happen! I figure I'll make more money in the long run by being dependable and therefore getting gigs with people I sub for in the future. Which has happened a lot!
  13. The Diaper Geni

    The Diaper Geni Supporting Member

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    Don't get me started. On one wedding gig I was on years ago an office person of the agency I worked for was on the gig playing trombone. I mentioned to him I was not aware he played trombone. He stated that he did not play trombone. The agency just needed a warm body up on stage because the contract specified X amount of players for the night and they couldn't find another horn player. So he was just up there moving the slide back and forth and he made what the rest of the band made. Nice.
  14. millsbass5

    millsbass5

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    That's a sure-fire way to gain the reputation as a band that does bad business, and burns bridges. You gotta take the good with the bad.
  15. HolmeBass

    HolmeBass

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    I think there are a lot of intangibles. But first thing, I would never bail with less than two weeks notice, the drummers who are bailing just days before had better be hooking you guys up with greats subs!

    Other intangibles include whether someone gigs full-time for a living. I accept that people in that situation need to make the most money they can with every gig. Then there are "important gigs, like show cases or festivals, and I can see people ditching a gig to play something like that. But under no circumstances would I be psyched with less than two weeks notice, and unless you're bailing more than a month out you should find a sub for the gig and get them the woodshed material. All in my opinion. I have a day job so I never bail on a gig, I play what I have booked.
  16. Roy Vogt

    Roy Vogt Supporting Member

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    It sure depends on the gig. I have a deep call list for General Business gigs, a lot of guys can play Brick House well. Jazz stuff gets a little trickier, but this is Nashville and there are lots of good choices. I have a few gigs I do where I'm an intrinsic part of the band and they're pretty much non-subbable, but there are other ones where I just use my common sense. There's no reason to bail for $50 more, but if it's a significant amount I will book a sub and contact the leader. I never bail on a gig and leave anyone hanging, too Much Bad Karma.
    As a Band Leader, I have players 3-4 deep on every chair. If my A guy can't make it, I go to the B guy, etc. Welcome to Nashville. It's nothing personal, just guys trying to make a living. I get that.
  17. thepontif

    thepontif

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    In fairness, the first drummer bailed a few weeks ago. The recent guy had a death in the family as had to tend to arrangements. So it's short notice, but I'm not really holding it against him.
  18. thepontif

    thepontif

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    He didn't get a sub, but did offer 3 names and numbers for us.
  19. thepontif

    thepontif

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    I recently had to bail on a wedding gig because I got a tour with Eldar Djangirov that I had to take. I got a sub for the guy. He hadn't even sent me the music, so I figured it wasn't too big a deal to send a sub. I had taken two gigs with him. I had to bail on the first. He was ok with it, and didn't use my sub but convinced his old bass player to cover the gig. Then he told me a couple days later he was taking me off the second one too. Said, "working with a new event coordinator and want everything to be smooth. Was planning on working out kinks on the first date." I told him I couldn't imagine how anything I would do would have any effect on how the event coordinator reacted, but it was his call. Truth is, I think he was just pissed and did it out of spite to a large degree.
  20. Roy Vogt

    Roy Vogt Supporting Member

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    Some leaders can do that, IME.

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