Going on China tour, rosin suggestions?

Discussion in 'Bows and Rosin [DB]' started by bopeuph, Dec 16, 2013.


  1. bopeuph

    bopeuph

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Hey guys,

    Got offered a job touring in China with an official production of Chicago. The cast is London's West-End cast, while the management is a lot of well-known Broadway guys. I was asked last week, and am heading out next week.

    The bass is being provided for me and is waiting for me in Wuhan at this moment. I'm bringing my bow and pickup gear.

    I use Hidersine 2 rosin right now. The tour goes as far north as Beijing and as far south as Fujian...a 1200 mile difference.

    There's minimal arco in the show, but I'm just curious. Is there a good all-around rosin I should use, or two separate ones for each place?
  2. Fez1

    Fez1

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    If you're picking up an unknown loaner in China, your rosin is gonna be the least of your worries.
  3. Fez1

    Fez1

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Oh, and... use pops
  4. bopeuph

    bopeuph

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Not really. Since most of the show is just jazz-style pizz, I'm not all too picky on the instrument...as long as they are providing me with an adjustable bridge so I can set the action to my comfort level. Won't sound as good as my rig, but it will still be in tune and in time...and as 'Trane said, you can play a shoestring if you're sincere.

    I'm more worried about what tuba I'm gonna end up with, since there are so many variations on one instrument.
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  6. MikeCanada

    MikeCanada

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    I wouldn't worry too much about changing rosins. From what I gather, Hidersine 2 is a medium rosin. If it behaves like a soft rosin because you are in Florida, it will likely seem like that in Fujian. From what I can gather, it isn't a huge change from Florida when it comes to climate. As for Beijing, it might behave more like a medium rosin. A quick weather network search says it's around -8° C there now. It will still be more than functional rosin, it will just be a little harder.

    If you're really concerned you might want to consider something like Pops or Kolstein Soft or whatever for up north. There are plenty of Canadians using medium rosins in our winters though, which are usually more extreme than Beijing. Having played Chicago, there really isn't that much that you do with the bow and just about any rosin will be fine. I did not double on tuba, and from the little I know about the instrument there are a TON of variations. It might be a little late now to request a specific type of tuba, but you should be able to ask what they're renting? At least that way if it isn't what you're used to you can still have a bit of a heads up?

    Best of luck. It sounds like a really great opportunity.
  7. bopeuph

    bopeuph

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Thanks, good to know, and I'll stick with the Hidersine.

    Yeah, I've been a low brass player long before I was a bassist. My only requirement is it be a B-flat horn, but I'm worried that will get lost in translation.
  8. MikeCanada

    MikeCanada

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    I have a few cousins that have been low brass players for life and now are educators. Although one seemed to stick to Euphonium, the other one would have a different instrument every single time we saw him. I have no idea how he could keep them straight. I don't know anything about them, but the fact that you could have 3, 4, or 5 valves, and they're all different sizes and some of them transpose... my brain hurts.

    Good thing this is a bass forum, and we don't have to think about that.
  9. bopeuph

    bopeuph

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Well, having lived in both worlds equally, I can tell you that most brass players wonder how we know where the notes are on the instrument. I usually compare a string instrument to the trombone. When you think about that, there's just about as much visually on the slide to show where the notes are, and then there's the embouchure where you can't see at all, yet have to change notes there, too.

    Each instrument has its own mystery to musicians that don't play it. It's kind of cool that we can learn from each other like that.

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