Grain Filler and Sanding Sealer

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Basso54, Jan 17, 2012.


  1. Basso54

    Basso54 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2003
    Location:
    Dalhart, TX
    On an ash body, do I need to fill the grain before the sanding sealer? Also, I could only find stain/varnish prep. It reads the same as grain filler, is this what I need, or do I need to go get actual grain filler?
     
  2. 1958Bassman

    1958Bassman

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    Depends on what you're trying to do. If you're going for an all-natural finish with semi-obscured grain, you can use a sanding sealer and sandpaper, working the slurry into the grain and as it dries, you can smooth as you go. Then, follow with a sanding block to level the surface before applying the finish coats.

    What finish are you planning to use? Poly, lacquer?
     
  3. Basso54

    Basso54 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2003
    Location:
    Dalhart, TX
    Reranch Lacquer. Either Black or Lake Placid Blue.
     
  4. Basso54

    Basso54 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2003
    Location:
    Dalhart, TX
    I'm very amateur at this, just trying to learn on my first finish. I would love to go natural, but the top of this thing was chewed up pretty bad and patched up by the previous owner(s).
     
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  6. praisegig

    praisegig Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Location:
    Stephenville, TX
  7. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Location:
    Southwest Michigan
    Disclosures:
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    ANY grain filling needs to be done after an initial washcoat of finish/sealer to seal the grain, allowing the filler to sit in the grain, and not have any of the solvents/ hardeners absorb into the wood which makes for slower and many times incomplete drying of the filler.

    Step by step filling;

    1) Sand body to at least 220 grit, 320 is the preferred.
    2) wipe clean with Denatured Alcohol, Lacquer thinner, or Acetone to fully clean and dewax/de-oil the surface
    3) Allow body to fully dry for 1 hour
    4) spray/apply a couple coats of finish(lacquer, poly, dewaxed shellac) to seal grain and allow to dry for 24 hours
    5) Sand the body with 320 or 400 grit to smooth before applying filler
    6) spread/apply filler as stated on the manufacturers label, and allow to dry for the manufacturers allotted time.
    7) Sand with 320 or 400 do a second coat of filler if needed
    8) Seal with another clear and allow to dry
    9) Lightly go over body with 400, wipe clean, and begin color coats....follow finishing regimine as prescribed from there

    This is a long process, but will help you to achieve a nice smooth surface to apply color to. Others may have different methods, thius is just how I go about prep for a color on Ash.
     
  8. seang15

    seang15 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Cary NC
    Hi MusicLogic, would you do this for translucent (Nitro Lacquer) as well? Thanks!
     
  9. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Location:
    Southwest Michigan
    Disclosures:
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Only if you are going for the grain enhancement. If going for the natural look I would use a clear epoxy fill and sand smooth then go with your lacquer top coats.
     
  10. seang15

    seang15 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Location:
    Cary NC
    Thanks for the reply, and info!
     
  11. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Location:
    Southwest Michigan
    Disclosures:
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O

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