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Has anyone repaired a turn table?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Casting Thunder, Jan 13, 2014.

  1. Casting Thunder

    Casting Thunder

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    My mom has this awesome stereo system from the 80s and a cabinet full of records; the problem is that the belt that turns everything has disinterested. The motor and everything else works fine, so I was wondering if it would be possible to repair the turn table myself? I was able to find a replacement belt before I was able to find anyone who could do the repair locally. Has anyone done this?
  2. braud357

    braud357

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    I cannot remember the name of the place, but I found a belt for my old Technics turntable a couple of years ago. Do an Internet search - I am sure you can find it !
  3. Doctor Hugocat

    Doctor Hugocat

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    One of my other expensive hobbies is turntables, and I can tell you that this is a very common occurrence.......

    Firstly, if you want more advice, go to the best truntable site on the 'net: www.vinylengine.com where you'll get lots of advice.

    There are a couple of places on the net where you can buy replacement belts, such as http://www.needledoctor.com/Turntable-Belts . There's another guy but I'm not at home right now and can't find his website.

    If you buy a 'generic' belt you have to ascertain the size: this isn't too difficult and we can help you over at the Vinyl Engine site.

    B
  4. DiabolusInMusic

    DiabolusInMusic Functionless Art is Merely Tolerated Vandalism Supporting Member

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    Technically no, but I have worked on many CED players. CED's are vinyl video discs, basically a movie LP. So take my advice with a grain of salt.

    Firstly, are you sure it is a belt drive? Some CED players are magnetic turntables, some are belts, I would imagine the same to be true of record players as it is essentially the same technology.

    I have found all my CED players to be extremely serviceable, most things are mechanical back then. When searching for a repairman for CED's I found a guy willing to work on them but he was based in home electronics and willing to try it, I would think you could definitely find a guy willing to do the repairs if you are not comfortable just be prepared to pay more than the unit is probably worth in labour costs.
  5. ZenG

    ZenG

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    l'll bet anything that the parts are available and that it can be fixed.

    (I was in an audio shop today.....got to bee-essing about records and turntables with the chap amongst other things as I saw a high -end turntable in the display case , which I thought was kind of odd. I said to him "Is that for sale? I thought those things were ancient history"

    He said " Hell no!! We sell dozens of those a year....plus the high end cartridges and all sorts of stuff..."

    I said " There's still a healthy market for that stuff?"

    He said "You betcha!"
  6. wighat

    wighat

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    It's easy. As I recall, you put the belt on the platter. There's a hole in the platter you stick your finger through to keep the belt on the platter and then put the belt onto the pulley.
  7. fhm555

    fhm555 So FOS my eyes are brown Supporting Member

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    IIRC most belt drive turntables run on an oversized O ring. A lot of sewing machines run on the same thing so take a piece of string and wrap it around both pulleys, and mark where they meet. This will be the ID of the O ring you need, then hit sewing machine places that do repair, stereo shops, industrial supply houses, any place you can think of that would have a stock of big O rings. I have an oddball little lightweight lathe that's been out of production for more than 40 years that runs off a big O ring between the motor and headstock pulleys and I've found belts in auto shops, sewing machine repair shops, and MacMaster Carr.

    Since most high end turntables are direct drive, it's rare, but you may find one with a flat toothed belt. If you have one like that it might be really tough to find the right belt as they are usually model specific and availability will depend on how many spares were made and how long ago they were made.
  8. noiseguy

    noiseguy

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    I've replaced belts in lots of audio devices. If you can get the right belt the hardest part is typically figuring out the routing... For tape players can be complex. I'd buy the belt and DIY.
  9. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

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    The belt is "disinterested"?

    Must be an expensive belt, to have actual emotions.

    But they're easy to replace. I fixed a VHS deck for a year by replacing a broken drive belt with a 1/4" wide rubber band.

    Get the belt, install it yourself. If in doubt as to assembly, take digital pictures as you dis-assemble.
  10. Chainsaw Willie

    Chainsaw Willie

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    I did it this summer. I found a turntable I have been storing as a spare for 30 years had disintegrated (autocorrect is so much fun when it doesn't know what you mean) on my first attempt to use it. I just punched the model into eBay and the first hit was a replacement belt. It was easy. The metal platter lifted straight up and out. I had to clean out the greasy mess that the belt had decayed into. I placed the flat belt around the motor pulley (and along an idler pulley if I remember right. The the rubber mat lifts off the metal platter exposing some big oval holes that allow you to manipulate the belt as you drop the platter back in place. Plop the rubber mat back on top, and play.

    I betcha there are youtube videos showing how it's done. Try searching your model number on YouTube or google. If it was a popular model you may find specific instructions. But it isn't really hard and it is pretty intuitive.
  11. MetroBass

    MetroBass Supporting Member

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    Disclosures:
    Hatred obscures all distinctions.
    I have fixed a couple of my old turntables with rubber bands. Seriously fine the right size and tension and they are great belt replacements. I have a linear tracking B&O that has had a rubber band on it for over a year and it works wonderful.
  12. P Town

    P Town Guest

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