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Help to identify jazz bass pickups - red and yellow wires

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by soaf, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. soaf

    soaf

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    Jul 27, 2013
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    Does anyone know the make/model of these?

    Attached Files:

  2. Lownote38

    Lownote38

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    70s Fender. That's how my 70s Mustang Bass was wired. Yellow and red wires.
  3. Teacher

    Teacher

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    Were they designed by Ronald McDonald?
  4. GlennW

    GlennW Supporting Member

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    I see nothing "Fender" about those pickups.
  5. line6man

    line6man

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    In the late '70s, when aftermarket replacement pickups became popular, Ronald McDonald took note of the success of companies like DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan. It was a new and exciting era, in which bassists worldwide had access to a wealth of pickup options. Bassists were happy, bands sounded better, and audiences enjoyed the music so much more than ever before. But, you see, this caused a problem for Mr. McDonald. Society was so focused on music, that hamburger sales were dropping! People couldn't afford to eat at McDonald's when all of their money was being spent on concert tickets, club admissions and vinyl records. Mr. McDonald was on the verge of bankruptcy, until he decided to get into the game and produce pickups of his own. The first and only generation of pickups included a Jazz bridge, Jazz neck, and two P bass coils, which were featured as Happy Meal toys for a short period. Kids were encouraged to collect them all, for the best tone. Just a few months after Mr. McDonald's "Good Food; Good Tone!" toy campaign, a more exciting toy was released, and sales quickly tripled. Between the success of the new toy line, and the troublesome lawsuits over lead poisoning from the solder used in the pickups, Mr. McDonald decided to retire his line of pickups, and donate the overstock to tone research foundations. And that was the end of his pickup building career.
    :bag:
  6. Teacher

    Teacher

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