Higher gauge D and G strings?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Backspacez, Apr 3, 2014.


  1. Backspacez

    Backspacez

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    I hate the thin, weak sound of the d and g string.

    Basically, I was thinking, just get two slightly higher guage strings and use them... is there any flaws to doing this? Do any of you guys do this?
  2. Gorn Captain

    Gorn Captain Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2011
    Location:
    Queens
    Have you tried raising the pickup height on the d and g side with your current strings?
  3. Backspacez

    Backspacez

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    I haven't. That's a good idea, gonna try it right now!

    Thanks
  4. Phalex

    Phalex Semper Gumby Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Location:
    G.R. MI
    I like .50 .70 .85 .105.
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  6. Backspacez

    Backspacez

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    Just tried it, big improvement! Can't believe I didn't try that before. Thanks for the tip man, makes the strings sound more even, if that makes any sense.

    I'd still like to hear your guys' experience with higher gauge D or G strings though.
  7. shawshank72

    shawshank72 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    +1
  8. shawshank72

    shawshank72 Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    Good to hear. But playing with a 50g and 70 d just makes me a happy player
  9. fourstringdrums

    fourstringdrums Decidedly Indecisive Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    I'm currently using .55 .70 .90 .105 GHS Precision Flats. With the exception of maybe going down to a .50 G I can't play lighter D & G strings.
  10. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    i gotta say i just assembled a homebrew set following d'addario's "balanced tension" spec and i like it a lot!

    45-60-80-110 actually gives me close to equal tension on all 4 strings, instead of "normal" sets which have tight middle strings and a looser E.
  11. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    Phoenix, Arizona 85029
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    Contrary to popular belief, lowering the gauge will actually get you a fatter sound. This is becaues the string has less tension and is able to vibrate more freely, thus increasing the presence of the fundamental and lower-order harmonics.
  12. wolfkeller

    wolfkeller Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2013
    Location:
    detroit
    I use rotos 50 70 85 110 and blue steel 50 70 85 105. I've uses slinky power 55 75 90 110. Thicker strings will produce more bass. I always felt light strings sounded whimpy. Its a thicker sound BUT more tension, they feel way tighter. I've done this since 1998. I do play in Eb and D though. Also I use black beauties for my sabbath tribute 50 70 85 110 for Eb and C# tunings and they rule
  13. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle
    Disclosures:
    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    This.

    Near-every G string IS a guitar string by design so you'll only ever get so good with it.
  14. jnprather

    jnprather Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2001
    Location:
    Northern California
    This is good stuff. I'm in the middle of trying to decide the best gauge to use for a C#-standard metal project, and tuning my B-string (.125) up to C# is too boomy. Tuning my E (.105) down to C# is fatter, although its a floppy buzzy mess at the moment. I'll probably end up settling with something around .115/.118 for the E string and tuning down.
  15. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle
    Disclosures:
    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    If the .125 is booming it may be too thin still - try a single .130 and see if that improves things.
  16. wolfkeller

    wolfkeller Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2013
    Location:
    detroit
    Like I said I tune to C# for my sabbath tribute band and I use the black beauties 50-110 and the strings are not at all too floppy or rubbery. I never go out of tune either.
  17. jnprather

    jnprather Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2001
    Location:
    Northern California
    Hmm. I was leaning towards getting something like the Circle K .118 4-string balanced set, leaving the old B string on there (save some $$ and not have to adjust the truss rod) and stringing it up that way. From tension charts etc it seems that something around .118 or so is about ideal for C#. But now you got me thinking!

    (Sorry for the threadjack OP)
  18. Marcus Willett

    Marcus Willett Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2005
    Location:
    Branson, Missouri
    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Bag End - Dean Markley - Thunderfunk
    True, i.e. a core with a single wrap unlike the other strings in a bass set...which has always been something that makes me nuts.

    Besides Thomastik, do you or anyone know who makes a bass G string that is NOT like that?

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