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How Big of an Amp?

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by Pbassmassacre, Nov 25, 2013.


  1. Pbassmassacre

    Pbassmassacre

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2013
    I have been outta the seen for awhile but am starting to get back in. I have a GK 150MB head withe a HartkeVX 4-10" cab. I just used this system for a small room playing classic rock type music and it seemed fine. Room held about 30 - 50 people. The head seemed to get pretty warm although I had the master up to about 3 o'clock and the input gain between 1/4 and 1/2 way up. It seemed to handle it fine. The cab is rated at 400 watts and the head at 150w.
    Would this be enough for, say, a 150 to 300 people club? Seems like the sound system takes over more these days?
    I have an vintage Acoustic 360 as well but that would just blast. Maybe better safe than sorry? I love that 360. I play a P-bass.
    I have a couple of club gigs coming up and would rather have too much than not enough, although the GK head and 4-10 cab is alot easier to haul.
    Thanks
     
  2. nick98338

    nick98338

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Location:
    Graham, Washington, USA
    Depends on how much of that room you need to "fill up". Like you said, the sound system can take care of the room. If you have a PA, that is. If you do have a PA, then your rig is really just a monitor for you and maybe the rest of the band. In that case your rig may be enough. Depends on how close together the musicians are.
    In that kind of case, I do fine with one cab and a 200watt head.
    However, if you do not have a PA.. if your rig has to cover that whole room, then you may want multiple cabs and more watts. It's difficult to recommend one combination to fit all possible situations. At least, I have not found one rig to fit all needs. So, I've gone modular. The rig fits the gig. For small I've got one cab with 200 watts. Medium, I've got two cabs and 350 watts. Big, I've got two cabs and 1000 watts. IRMV
     
  3. two fingers

    two fingers You tahkin 'uh me? Yeah, you. You tahkin 'uh me? Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern NC USA
    Either will get the job done. Just let tone be your guide. If you really dig the 360, lug it out a couple times. You only have to move it twice a night. Not that big of a deal.

    By the way, it looks like you just joined. WELCOME to TalkBass!
     
  4. B-string

    B-string Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, Az USA
    If all you need is a shotgun, bring the shotgun. If you're going to need a cannon, leave the shotgun at home :).

    Small to medium I use (still overkill) 350 watts into a 212. Larger stuff 500 into a 412 that gets me through even good sized outside gigs. We are audience geared, not personal volume geared though.
     
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  6. Gaolee

    Gaolee The Fat Violin

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    I find hauling around a 360 is easier than dealing with a 410 cabinet. A 410 combo is even worse. Those are sized just right to make your back miserable unless you have a hand truck, and even then, they are awkward. I have been using a 360 and now a new one for a number of years for just about everything. Once you get the hang of moving them like a hand truck and the technique of sliding the cabinet into the van on its back, they are actually very easy to move. The difference is the 360 is the hand truck and the cabinet doesn't need to be strapped on to navigate awkward pavement or stairs or any of the other inevitable obstacles.

    They are big and imposing looking, so you will look a little absurd on a small stage in a cafe, but I don't mind that a bit. In a bigger room, they really come into their own. They have a volume knob and sound good played through softly, too. I have never had a problem getting the volume dialed into where it should be.

    Every so often, somebody recognizes the 360 for what it is. That can be pretty entertaining by itself.
     
  7. Pbassmassacre

    Pbassmassacre

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2013
    Canon always sounds better. They both sound good with my P-bass. Actually, yes,the 4-10 Hartke is harder to lug around but it fits in my car. I'll have to see if the 360 will. I dont think so but I have a Jeep and that will work. Lots of punch and volume in that Acoustic. Seeing as I'm playing in a Zep tribute it will be fitting also. I've used this amp for years. Guess I'll see what these room requirements are. Yep, new here. Thanks for the welcome.
     
  8. Pbassmassacre

    Pbassmassacre

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2013
    I meant, "Cannon", per B-Strings post.
     
  9. B-string

    B-string Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, Az USA
    Yes I had a 360/361 for many years, loved that sucker but short throw rooms were a mess for it.
     
  10. Gaolee

    Gaolee The Fat Violin

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    That's the one drawback. If the back wall is within about 20 feet and is concrete block, it's going to be tough to get much besides a muddy mess. I only had that be an issue once. The only other time I had a problem with the 360 was when the hollow stage somehow resonated with the bottom of the cabinet and made an awful muddy mess. Turning down a hair fixed that problem. The back wall problem got better with a bit of tweaking, but the show was over before I it out. If I had been thinking, turning the amp at an angle to the back wall might have helped. But, I wasn't thinking.
     

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