How did they make this body?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by StuartV, Feb 13, 2014.


  1. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    I have this J body that I got from Warmoth a while back. I always just assumed it had a flamed maple cap laminated on top of some other wood. But, I gave that a little more thought recently and now it doesn't make sense.

    It has a forearm contour, and the flame figuring shows all the way to the edge of the contour. So, if it's a flame maple cap, it would have to something like an inch thick. And looking at the other sides of the bass, it seems pretty clear that that's not the case.

    I compared it to my Millennium, which also has a flame maple top and a forearm contour and it looks like what I'd expect. The flamed maple appears to be a roughly 1/4" thick cap on top of the rest of the body.

    So, how does Warmoth do this so that the flame figuring shows on the whole forearm contour? Is the flame part just a super thin laminate that they steam and bend across the forearm contour or something? How thick is it?

    Warmoth:
    [​IMG]

    Peavey Millennium:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. joeyl

    joeyl Supporting Member

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  3. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    Aha! Just as I suspected!

    Thanks for the link!
     
  4. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    It doesnt have to be a thin veneer. These two that I built both have slightly thicker than 1/4" tops. What I do is cut the body shape out of the main body wood, cut the contour into that, clamp the top to the body making sure the center lines are lined up. Then I steam bend the top to the contour and clamp it in place for a few days. Then I take it out of the clamps and glue the top on. Its fairly easy really. The steam makes the wood very easy to bend.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  6. joeyl

    joeyl Supporting Member

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    those look nice, Hopkins
     
  7. joeyl

    joeyl Supporting Member

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    you're welcome. Remember you have to read the whole Warmoth site before making a purchase decision ;)
     
  8. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    Ha ha ha! Yes, I've heard that! :D
     
  9. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    Hopkins, those look awesome! What kind of equipment do you use to do the steam bending?
     
  10. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    One of these, they make a ton of very hot steam. Every builder should have one in his shop..
     
  11. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    Sweet! I already have one of those! Now all I need is a band saw. And a radial arm saw. And a router. And a sander. Annnndd... a bucketful of talent.

    Then I'll be good to go.
     
  12. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    So, when you bend a top like that, do you worry at all about the moisture that ends up in the wood between the top and the body? After clamping it for a while, will it hold its shape when you take it off, so you can let it and the body dry before you glue them together?
     
  13. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    You are only really introducing moisture into the top, so you are not really introducing to much moisture. After it dries, and you take it out of clamps it will spring back slightly but it can be glued and clamped with no problems.
     
  14. Arnie

    Arnie

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    or a vacuum sealer, that will pull the top right down on the contours..
     
  15. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    I would still steam the top before using a vacuum bag.
     
  16. JustForSport

    JustForSport

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    Maybe meant to steam (bend), then vacuum bag to glue?
    Or vacuum bag to bend (after steaming), then clamp/vacuum bag to glue?
    Boat-builder/ epoxy methods?
     
  17. Beej

    Beej

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    Hopkins that steamer looks like a smart idea - what the hell am I still doing with my jerry-rigged old espresso maker? lol... :)
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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    If my mom wasn't a custom drapery maker I would have never known those steamers existed. Its actually her steamer, I can just use it whenever I need it.
     
  19. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    Yeah, if my girlfriend wasn't a total fashion diva, I wouldn't have known about them or have one (hers), either. :D
     
  20. mrz2u

    mrz2u

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  21. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

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