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how to know stuff like 7th's and minor

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Kenn, Jan 31, 2013.


  1. Kenn

    Kenn

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Ok beginner question.
    On a bass guitar lets say in for instance in a key of G you see Fm7, where is that played on a bass guitar? Same as an F?
     
  2. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2002
    Location:
    Reims, Champagne, France
    Fm7 is a chord, not a note. It is composed of 4 notes. You can choose to just play the root of the chord, which is F. It works most of the time.
    I know you just took a random example but there is no Fm7 in the key of G.
    Search for basic harmony instruction, including formation of chords. It isn't as tricky as it looks.
     
  3. anonparrot

    anonparrot

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    The root of the chord is still F - so playing an F would be fine. You could also play the 7th note (E flat I think) in the minor scale - and that would sound fine as well.

    If in doubt playing the root note will get you by.

    --Chris
     
  4. zfunkman

    zfunkman

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    There are 7 notes in any key. In the key of G, G is the first note. The first, third, fifth, and seventh notes make up a 7 chord; G B D F# = Gma7(I), A C E G = Am7(II),
    B D F# A = Bm7(III), C E G B = Cma7(IV) D F# A C = D7(V) E G B D = Em7(VI) F# A C E = F#1/2 diminshed(VII). Ther is one sharp# in the key of G and that is F#. This is the basics of music theory. You can add or take out any notes to make the alternate chords of non-7 chords. No matter what note you start on its the same order. You can actually figure out every scale and every chord in any key with this formula. Fm is not actually in the key of G let alone the note of F. The bass usually plays the root note of the chord. Each key also has a relative major and minor; in the key of G, Em is the relative of Gma (the I and the VI).
     
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  6. Lowactnsatsfctn

    Lowactnsatsfctn

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Location:
    Central Ca
  7. MalcolmAmos

    MalcolmAmos Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2009
    Location:
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    My copy of this is framed and right above my practice chair.
    Here is the rest of the story. http://www.billygreen.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Music Theory - Basic, Intermediate, Advanced.pdf

    Welcome to our World. Have fun.
     
  8. Joe Louvar

    Joe Louvar

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Location:
    Santa Rosa, CA USA
  9. speeves

    speeves

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Location:
    Nevada
    Just remember... Because we are the all powerful bass note, (the lowest sounding note), we wield the power to change the type of chord the rest of the band is creating by playing different notes in the chord.

    Experiment in practice, and use carefully when playing with others :)

    Have fun!
    speeves
     

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