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Ibanez SR vs. ATK series

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by ThomClaire, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. ThomClaire

    ThomClaire

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    So, I've played on an ATK800e quite a bit, and really like it. I'm curious to know how guys would compare that bass to the SR series?

    EDIT: I meant to specify that I am talking about SR500 +
  2. BassmanM

    BassmanM

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    This is like comparing apples and oranges.
  3. eccles77

    eccles77

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    Different beast all together. Pickups, body material, size of neck. I have owned both and think the ATK sounds better, I really like the triple coil, but I prefer the shape and build of a decent SR.
  4. Solarmist

    Solarmist 15 miles from Mt Rainier Supporting Member

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    They are two entirely different basses other than being Ibanez. Personally I'll take the SR for it's super slim neck, 3band Bart system, looks, and lighter weight.

    It's all about personal preference; they're both great basses.
  5. Mystic Michael

    Mystic Michael Hip No Ties Supporting Member

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    Nobody yet has really answered the OP's question in any detail. I'll take a stab at it:

    The ATK series is known for its ballsy aggressiveness. Sort of the "poor man's Stingray", although strictly speaking that's not entirely accurate. With it's big, badass exposed-polepiece humbucker pickup(s), it's a very punchy, growly, rude sort of beast. Not the kind of bass you'd bring to your sister's wedding. More the kind of bass you'd take to a bar fight. :smug:

    The SR series, by contrast, is much more polite, more hi-fi. Especially those with Bartolini pickups. Much smoother, much more wide-range frequency response. Think clean, clear, open & sweet. The kind of bass you could bring to the prom.

    Does that help? :meh:

    MM
  6. ThomClaire

    ThomClaire

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    It does! That's more of the kind of answer I was looking for. I know this is like comparing apples and oranges, but I'm not asking which one is better; I'm simply asking what are the differences in sound and feel.

    I know the appropriate and best way to answer this for myself is to go play both of them, which I intend to do.

    Can someone tell me more about the difference between the pickups each has to offer? Frankly, I know nothing about pickups.

    Also, what did you mean by the SR being more hi-fi?
  7. jeff7bass

    jeff7bass

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    Nailed it. :bassist:
  8. J-wall

    J-wall

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    I appreciate MysticMichael's assessment, but I find myself wondering how in the heck the SR line got the reputation as a metal bass if it is the kind of bass you would take to the prom? Are metal bassists really big, soft-hearted teddy bears in leather pants?

    In other words, the pleasant description doesn't seem to fit with the "stereotypical" users - though I am not meaning to dismiss the description. I don't own a straight SR yet, just an SRA with an SGD neck pickup, and no, I don't play metal. Michael's description fits with what I hear even from my SRA and my needs. What makes the Metal crowd love them?

    Dare we say that a good bass is simply a good bass and that you can use any good bass for any good music? Nah, surely not, most of the tension of this forum would then evaporate.
  9. cfsporn

    cfsporn

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    No, but they both like the same types of basses. Thin necks, active pups, thin necks, and modern tone.
  10. Mystic Michael

    Mystic Michael Hip No Ties Supporting Member

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    I'm about as far from being a metalhead as one can get, so what follows is pure speculation. But...

    It seems to me that when you're faced with a wall of distorted guitar sound emanating from a pair of Marshall and/or Mesa full stacks, the last thing you want to add to the mix is even more nasty, dirty, growly, aggressive distortion.

    On the contrary, you want to find a way to cut through. You want to obtain some contrast. And the easiest way to achieve that is with clarity.

    Also consider that since the Ibanez SR basses have one of the narrowest necks in the business, they also have some of the narrowest string spacing - which means they are fast, fast, fast. Perfect for high-speed picking (not so much plucking or slapping) - such as with speed metal (don't know much about all the other sub-genres).

    MM
  11. ThomClaire

    ThomClaire

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    Well, I just learned that the G&L that I've been playing on (my father's) has 1" 3/4 at the nut while the SR is about a quarter of an inch less. Does that much make a huge difference in your hand? I've always found trouble getting to the top strings on the G&L as I have small hands, but I feel like that's such a difference that it may be too much.

    I'm going to try one out as soon as I can make my way to a store with one in stock, but I wanted to hear your opinions.
  12. jeff7bass

    jeff7bass

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    Although I rarely see a nice ATK at GC, I usually see some SR's so you really have to play one. My ATK had a neck a little smaller than a P-bass but bigger than a J bass. I liked it. Since you mentioned having trouble with wider necks I would think the SR bass would be better for you. They're light and very easy to play, at least the SR500 I played was. Nice looking bass too. I came "this" close to buying one but I had a Carvin on order so...

    As for the sonic differences, those can somewhat be made up with a versatile amp and perhaps a good distortion pedal, one which is designed for bass and doesn't lose bottom when you stomp on it. My bass Gear mag preview two really great bass distortion/overdrive pedals. I think if you're into metal, you might want to read up on them.
    :bassist:
  13. Bongolation

    Bongolation

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    Monkey see, monkey do. Same as always.

    Quite a bunch of inaccuracies here about the ATKs, especially the new ones -- which are very different from the "real" ones made previously.
  14. CoarseBass

    CoarseBass

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    I don't think many posters in this thread have significant experience with these basses, judging by the totally flubbed facts and generalizations.

    I own an ATK700, a generation old take on the platform. Great bass, with a 1.625 neck like most modern P basses and a nice neck volute, heavily rounded fret ends and a fast satin finish...its my favorite bass neck I've ever played, despite some finish ugliness and a high fret. I've modified the bass significantly, and it still isn't done, but its my main axe and my go to 4 string.

    Newer atks are better made, smaller and a hell of a lot lighter. They feel fantastic, though the neck is subtlely slimmer and raw, which is less to my liking. The sound is...thinner, I haven't loved the ones I've played. The new basses have drastically different pickups than the older ones...but I think they are now stand J and MM sizes, so the sky is the limit on replacements. I haven't seen that verified yet, but I can't imagine ibanez scdewing the pooch by making them look alike but not standard sizes.

    I never dug SRs, but the new mid range ones are fantastic basses, huge range of tones from snarly, dirty mid jazz to smooth, deep round sounds, flat HiFi kinda tones... the necks feel tiny in my hand, but so fast, with great wood and great build quality.

    As an ATK owner...I am looking at getting an SR 6 string soon, but the desire for a new light ATK is strong. Can't go wrong, honestly.
  15. huckleberry1

    huckleberry1 Supporting Member

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    Disclosures:
    student
    Today my Stingray Classic 5 arrived via U.P.S., but I digress. I bought an Ibanez ATK805E in may. I love this bass. I play through a GK rig and can get snarls or deep crooning, it is a very versatile instrument. I can't speek to the SR but up to today it was my main axe.
  16. minimal

    minimal Supporting Member

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    Burn the witch! Heretic! Blasphemer! Get out of here with your... your dirty.. filthy... logic.

    Next your going to say that there is no "best" bass, but probably just something like a "best" bass for that particular person for that particular music and playing style...

    Craziness I tell you. Craziness.
  17. J-wall

    J-wall

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    Lol! Please forgive me for my errant ways!

    I am glad to hear that the ATK can be versatile, true, I have never played one. My SR505 will arrive on Wednesday, so I technically don't own that yet either, but as I said, I do own an SRA505. It is the reason I have bought the SR. I really do love the neck. (the SRA is the same width, just a mm or two thicker)

    Now, in reference to the comments about the spacing of the G&L neck and if you notice if the strings/nut are more narrow - Heck, yes, you notice, at least, I do.

    I started on a Jazz 4, same bridge spacing as a/my P but more narrow nut. I noticed that difference less than when I got my first 5er - a Carvin LB75 - that felt SO crowded because it was considerably more narrow with an extra string! I learned to like it, but it was traumatic at first.

    I have gone back and forth on width preference, but today, I love the narrowness of my Ibanez, and I want to sell my P - it feels HUGE now. I have girl hands, I play with my fingers, and the Ibby 5 just feels right for me.

    Remember, also, I have played for 18 years and these discoveries as well as speaker configuration and amp preferences seem to take time, and a bit of money. Enjoy the ride!
  18. cfsporn

    cfsporn

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    I played a brand new ATK805E the other day, and it matched everything that MysticMichael said. Chunky neck, chunky tone, kinda like a EBMM but... different (I won't say better or worse). I loved it enough to seriously consider buying it then and there. I haven't played a "real" ATK, but I did own an older ATK300 for about 3 weeks...
  19. Rockin Mike

    Rockin Mike Supporting Member

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    Yes the nut width makes a huge difference in the feel. Try different ones and see for yourself.
    No law against taking a tape measure to the music store.
  20. Bassdirty

    Bassdirty

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    I had a SR505...and Ive also had an ATK 305.

    Totally different animals..as been said.
    I did like the tones from the 305 but one HUGE difference is the weight. ATK seemed like it was 15 lbs, prolly only 13, but heavy as heck.

    505 otoh, lightest bass i ever had, seemed like 7 lbs (but was prolly 9), and sounded decent enough.

    If I was gonna choose all over again, Id take the SR505, by a mile, the weight, it looks better IMO (wish they werent reddish poop colored) the ATK body just looked too big i think.

    Oh yeah, they both played well, II liked the neck on the sr505 better, but you gotta like narrow string spacing.


    YMMV..

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