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Inspired from "A Study in Fourths" by Walter Bishop, Jr. - Part 2

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by bstern, Jan 24, 2014.

  1. bstern

    bstern

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    Here is the continuation of an earlier post based on the 1976 publication "A Study in Fourths" by the late, legendary pianist, Walter Bishop, Jr., dealing with the creation of lines utilizing the interval of a Perfect 4th. A free downloadable exercise is available.
  2. davewave

    davewave Old and in the way... Supporting Member

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    Thank you, Mr. Bobby Stern, for sharing.
    It's very cool for a horn player and musical educator to reach out to the bass playing community.

    I only lately became aware of Walter Bishop, Jr. when I had a drink with a local harp player and singer who was a friend of his when they were coming up in NYC in the 60s. When he told me I should check him out, I found your charts and links to his videos, great stuff.

    A Study In Fourths is particularly apt for bassists, since that's how we're tuned.
    I transposed one of Mr. Bishop's exercises from Jeff Helgesen's transcription in Guitar Pro and exported it for fretted electric bass with tab, to see the pattern walking up the fretboard.

    Attached Files:

  3. Anonymatt

    Anonymatt

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    I played exercises and they were fun. One of the ones from the blog sounds a lot like a part from a record Bill Evans did with Claus Ogerman. Were 4ths an "in thing" for a while in the 70s? I read something somewhere that gave me that impression...
  4. chicagodoubler

    chicagodoubler

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    Endorsing Artist: Lakland, Genz Benz
    Dave,

    I never knew where that came from, but David Baker loves that stuff, and made us practice it in retrograde, as well.

    Thanks for sharing!
  5. Violen

    Violen Instructor in the Vance/Rabbath Method Supporting Member

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    Frank Mantooth had a jazz piano book that covered a lot of the same ideas. Thank you for posting that article :)
  6. davidhilton

    davidhilton Supporting Member

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    Bishop really wrote out a study of fourths by writing F to A# to D# to G# to C#...seriously? Or is this how ur notation program wrote it? F to Bb to Eb to Ab to Db would be hella easier to read yo! Lets transpose that for Bb instruments: G to B# to E# to A# to D#...i don't think u would make friends with the trumpet section...easier to read: G to C to F to Bb to Eb...r people really afraid of flats!!!??? lol lol just sayin! Its all good yo!!
    Disclaimer: Everything I post on TB is only my opinion man!!!! lol
    www.basslessonslosangeles.com
  7. davewave

    davewave Old and in the way... Supporting Member

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    Ha! I'm busted, I only read tab. :oops:
    I included the standard notation as a courtesy to you hot-shot Berklee types.
    Thanks for being kind and gentle to a self-taught old guy who never took a bass lesson in his life.

    You're correct, that's how the software output it.
    I considered scoring it differently, but with all the accidentals, it seemed awkward any way I looked at it.
    Does this look better, start in F and change keys 11 times?
    Guitar Pro software will spit it out most any way you want, but does have an annoying default of sharping rather than flatting accidentals.

    Mr. Bishop wrote it for piano, but appended some exercises for other instruments.
    The trombone example continues on like that for 11 more iterations.
    I'm lost as soon as it goes above middle C. ;)

    There's a page of bass exercises in the original book that I'll try to notate when I get a chance.

    Attached Files:

  8. davewave

    davewave Old and in the way... Supporting Member

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    This is the first exercise from Chapter VIII, The Instrumentalist's Approach.

    Attached Files:

  9. DrayMiles

    DrayMiles

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    I've been working through this book for about a year. It has definitely been eye opening.

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