Line 6 Bass POD pro

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Monkabutt, May 28, 2002.


  1. Monkabutt

    Monkabutt Guest

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2002
    Location:
    My house
    Anyone have experience with the Line 6 Bass POD Pro? Looking at it more for live applications than studio. Love it or hate it or just too darn complicated to mess with?

    MB
     
  2. Jontom

    Jontom

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2002
    Location:
    New York
    Sent from the heavens! (chorus of angels...AHHHHHHHHHHHH) I've had mine a year, could not exist w/o it anymore. I use the Acoustic 360 but theres more to choose from. I have the FXB floor switch, Channel 1=clean, Channel 2=microsynth, Channel 3=mutron, Channel 4=big muff. I've only scratched the surface! Get it and run with it and never look back. Run For-rest! RUn!
     
  3. Johnny BoomBoom

    Johnny BoomBoom

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2001
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland

    Depends what you're wanting it for. I got mine based on the advertising hype. I was proably more in the market for a multieffects unit. The effects are disappointing with very little control over them (well that's what I found!). The amp modelling is what it does best - as well as the cab modelling. My problem was that I'm not too sure of what these classic amps should sound like anyway!

    Anyways, I traded mine back in and got a Boss GT-6B, I'm much happier now!
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1999
    Location:
    Brighton, England, UK, Europe
    For most people I can't see the point - so if you like the sound of say an Acoustic 360, then why not buy one?! As has been mentioned, the effects are limited and don't sound that good - you would be better off with the effects you want.

    Why do you need loads of different amp/cab sounds unless you are a studio session player who is trying to re-create classic sounds from the past?And even then, most studios are now using digital recording with things like "Amp Farm" in Pro Tools - I can only see this as hype or a high-priced toy for bedroom bassists! :rolleyes:
     
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  6. Monkabutt

    Monkabutt Guest

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2002
    Location:
    My house
    I spent about an hour with the Bass POD Pro at the local shop last night and was less than impressed with it. Didn't think the effects sounded that good. Kind of sterile and brittle. Also seems like a lot of hiss with several settings. None of the factory presets really did much for me. After an hour with the Bass POD I decided that the $600 would be much better spent elsewhere.

    $0.02
    MB
     
  7. BFunk

    BFunk Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2001
    Location:
    Rhode Island , USA
    Met a bassist at a gig. His band was opening for us. Got around to talking gear, naturally. He told me he didn't need tubes. He had a Bass POD Pro and Mackie power amp. The POD did a great tube amp simulation, the best he ever heard. I told him that I thought they were nice but no dice.

    That night he used my all tube -- Kern IP-777, Aguilar DB 728 -- bass rig. He was smiling from ear to ear the whole time. When he got off stage, I asked him what he thought. He answered, "The POD is not even close."

    Digital modelling amps capture the sound of a real tube amp under particular circumstances. But a tube amp is a lot more than just a sound. It plays with you. Caress it and it purrs, dig into it and it roars. It's alive. You don't get that out of a modelling amp.
     
  8. Jontom

    Jontom

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2002
    Location:
    New York
    Why don't I buy a 360? Because I already own one and the Pod does it spot-on at about 1/4 the weight. For a steady gigging bassist this is important...I have the Pod rackmounted and it has already taken a top of stack-to floor spill with ease! I cover everything from Neil Diamond to Limp Bizkit, so versatility is a MUST. I just find myself using the 360 a lot because its what I've been playing since '88 and I'm used to that sound. I do some recording on the side, and for what I do, I can dial in ANYTHING! It suits my apps perfectly. And don't be so hard on the effects, the ones I have on the floorboard are THERE. As Madoona says, what do I have to do to "Justify My Love"?
     
  9. Johnny BoomBoom

    Johnny BoomBoom

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2001
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland

    I can only speak for myself on this one. I was looking for a mulit effects unit - which is not the PODs primary function! I am not sure about the amp modelling - 'cos I don't know what these amps are meant to sound like! I've played and loved Trace Elliot for about the past 10 years - that's the sound I like ( not to everyone's taste I know, but I like it). I found the effects were not up to what I wanted them to be like, and it didn';t really cover well all of the things I wanted!


    I don't doubt the versatility of the unit, the digital clock to work with Pro Tools is no doubt very useful, as I guess the re-amping facility. Although, we tried to use the re-amping facility and to be honest the results were less than impressive. I'd DId my Spector straight into the desk, and we couldn't find any amp model to actually improve the sound - after much trying we gave up!

    Anyway, sauffice it to say that I'm much happier with the GT-6B, and for what it's worth, it has some amp and cab modelling built into it - it all works out at less than half the price of the POD Pro plus floorboard!
     
  10. Murf

    Murf

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2001
    Location:
    Ireland
    The Pod is NOT a dedicated effects unit its primarily an amp modeller (with a few fecky effects thrown in) also its a lot easier to bring a pod to a session than lug an acoustic 360.

    Hate to disagree Bruce but I bought a pod specifically because most studios I worked in either had a pod as part of their setup and if they didnt invariably the engineers asked if you had one. (also the recorded sound from the pod mixing the straight di with the modelling features is far superior to most direct di's and requires less 'tweaking' of the signal(s) during mix down).

    Its believed that the best recorded bass sounds are achieved by mixing a straight di with a miked cab (and in some cases a miked bass to capture the 'acousticness' of the instrument), so its a hell of a lot easier to bring one pod to a session than a load of amp/cab combos, also, one of the best studio features of the pod is the ability to lay down the track and THEN 'audition' various amp/cab combinations to see which works best with the track.

    Its pretty good live as well.
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 1999
    Location:
    Brighton, England, UK, Europe
    Well the studios I've been in are using Pro Tools extensively for digital recording - I know it is used extensively in the US as well - so like the last Steely Dan album. The producers I've talked to wouldn't want the noise that something like the POD produces and would use a digital tool like "Amp Farm" or similar.
     
  12. Murf

    Murf

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2001
    Location:
    Ireland
    I'll have to bow to your knowledge on this Bruce as I know bugger all about Pro Tools:) however as a working session bassist for a number of years my job involved showing up plugging in and playing and also having the best sound for the job. I never had the luxury of tweaking or 'getting' a sound after the session and more often than not the final mix had (typically) the bass buried under a mass of guitars or synths.

    I remember when the Bass pod first came out it became the bassists 'secret weapon' (among my circle), we could show up, plug in, play and have phenomenal sound (which also helped getting even more gigs ;) also if so and so was doing a session using a specific amp/cab configuration and had to drop out he could just download his settings into someone elses pod and away theyd go.

    Shortly afterwards pods started popping up in all the studios I worked in and engineers were raving about them.

    I dont understand this at all, I have never had problems with excessive/any noise from using pods (there is a built in noise gate but I've never had to use it).

    (funnily enough I found that 'some' noise seems to let the character of the bass sit in the track better).

    To sum up as I said I know nothing about Pro tools, all I know is the Pod is perfect for my needs and as the fella says "different strokes for different folks"

    (hey I cant feel my right arm....)
     
  13. Jontom

    Jontom

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2002
    Location:
    New York
    The only time I hear noise out of it is at a high gain/high treble setting with a few of the distortion effects.(Which is the same noise you would get if you used those settings w/those particular amp/effects in the non-digital world). So you have to take the good with the bad, its just giving you the honest clone of the real thing. The only effect I don't like is the OC-2. There is no independent control over the individual octaves volume. So I remedied that by using an OC-2 in the effects loop. No problem. And for those who have tried it out for an afternoon, I am still figuring this thing out after a year! Its infinitely tweakable.
     

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