Loud overtones after changing the nut?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Chrisk-K, Jan 16, 2013.


  1. Chrisk-K

    Chrisk-K

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    The original nut of my Geddy Lee worn out, so I put a bone nut. Now several *fretted* notes (especially on the D & G strings) have loud overtones.

    Fretted notes should not be influeced by the nut. So I don't understand why I'm hearing overtones that I didn't hear before. I didn't change the strings. Any ideas??
     
  2. ics1974

    ics1974

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    maybe the angle of the nut slot is causing the overtones? If you damp the stings behind the nut with an elastic or have someone touch the string behind the nut does the overtones go away?
     
  3. Chrisk-K

    Chrisk-K

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    I already tested it. Nothing behind the nut is causing the overtones.

    I just tested the bass for about 10 more minutes. During the first 5 minutes or so I didn't hear the offending overtones. But they came back!! Am I going insane or what? How is this possible?
     
  4. JLS

    JLS Supporting Member

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    Would you possibly be playing through a tube amp, that's taking awhile to warm up?

    Have you listened with headphones only?
     
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  6. Chrisk-K

    Chrisk-K

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    I'm playing with a GK MB200 through a GK NEO112 cab. I'll change the strings and see what happens.
     
  7. Scott in Dallas

    Scott in Dallas

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    I recently cut a new nut for one of my six strings, and I'm not a fan of the way it sounds.

    I was going to suggest changing the strings just to be safe. It's a whole lot easier than replacing the nut. Also make sure everything's installed the same as always.

    Is the nut secured down, or is tension the only thing holding it in? Might be a factor.

    Good luck, I hope it's something simple.
     
  8. Chrisk-K

    Chrisk-K

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    It was the strings! They were 2 year old Hi-Beams that I recently resurrected using denatured alcohol. It was my first try using denatured alcohol. I wasn't too impressed with the result. I'd rather buy new sets.

    Anyway, it was my first try to replace the entire nut. I had to cut bottom corners of the premade nut because of the Geddy's neck binding. Interestingly, the Geddy required a flat-bottomed nut (not curved), so I sanded down the new nut. I ended up sanding too much and used an aluminium foil as a shim. It was a hack job. But now my Geddy sounds good and intonation all over the fingerboard is dead on.
     
  9. One Drop

    One Drop Supporting Member

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    Soaking strings is good for freshening up a set that is losing its new sound but won't resurrect a dead set of rounds.
     
  10. Growly Lytes

    Growly Lytes

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    I had top notch results with denatured Alcool & cleaning strings.
    Back to new strings they are, 24 hours in an air tight glass container.
    They rip it now.
    How long did yo use the stuff to soak them in Chrisk-K ?
     
  11. Lee Bruton

    Lee Bruton Guest

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    I think cleaning strings in alcohol or boiling is such a was of time and good alcohol!
    but that's just me
     

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