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Massaranduba/Bulletwood neck laminate?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Phil Jolly, Nov 17, 2012.


  1. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
    Greetings fellow TBers. I have designed and plan to build my own bass at some point in the future. I want to use a wenge through neck but want to make it very stiff/strong (high elastic strength). Has anyone used massaranduba in the past and would it work as a neck laminate? Thanks for your help, hopefully there will be a photo attached, i haven't got up to posting photos in the text yet, I'm new to this haha. I have done the CAD drawings on google sketchup if anyone wants an email of the file.
    Cheers. :bassist:

    Edit: Forgot to mention, i want to make the neck very strong so i can make in thin :)
     
  2. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
    Additional stuff to interest you...
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Woods:
    Wenge + possible massaranduba laminate neck
    Bubinga pommele body
    cocobolo fretboard
    light coloured wood stripes, maple or yellowheart or something

    4 string, standard tuning
    864mm scale length
    Nordstrand big singles pickups
    Aguilar OBP-3 preamp
    Hipshot hardware (could possibly make my own bridge out of brass at Uni.
     
  3. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
  4. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2002
    Location:
    Maryland
    Disclosures:
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    I've never used massaranduba but obviously by its numbers it is quite stiff. Most here would agree that wenge is stiff enough to make a fine neck on its own.

    I think in "going thin" you will reach the point where you have to worry about the truss rod pushing through the back of the neck before you reach the point where a neck of wenge an massaranduba neck is not stiff enough.
     
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  6. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
    Thanks for the help, i've been sulking waiting for a reply haha. I was thinking it might be strong enough to have just the wenge but as i have never built a bass before i really have no clue :confused:
    From an aesthetic point of view, i might go ahead and use the laminate depending on the cost but its nice to be assured that the neck will be sufficiently strong. I still need to do drawings of the profile and thickness of the fretboard.
    Could i ask for your opinion on my design? Constructive criticism is always welcome. Thankyou for your reply,
     
  7. AltGrendel

    AltGrendel Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Location:
    Mid-Atlantic USA.
    I like it, kind of like a Ritter. When you start building, post pics.
     
  8. Big B.

    Big B.

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    The wenge neck would be just fine by itself but the bulletwood certainly won't hurt anything. I also agree about the thickness being more about your trus rod than the wenge.

    I think your design looks great but keep in mind with a bubinga body and wenge neck it could get quite heavy.
     
  9. MarthaSamira

    MarthaSamira Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
  10. octaedro7

    octaedro7

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Location:
    Leidschendam, Netherlands
    SR neck... Delicious!
     
  11. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
    Thankyou, i'll take that as a compliment :) I hope its not too much like a Ritter, i drew a few versions and then modified my favourite to make this one. As i'm not now or probably ever going to be a proper luthier haha, could i get away with this level of similarity? The designs were inspired by typical Fender, Cort artisan series, Carl Thompson and a few others.
    When i build it (If i don't build it this summer it might be a while off haha) i will be sure to do a detailed blog of the process and its many mistakes :)
     
  12. David Pinton

    David Pinton

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Location:
    Normandie, France
    Disclosures:
    Builder DPinton Guitars and Basses
    It's a favourite of mine
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Fretboard too
    [​IMG]

    Very hard and stiff, almost too hard for a fretless board...
     
  13. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
    Thankyou sir! I'm honored to receive a reply from you, I've been admiring your work for a while now :hyper:
    I think i will go ahead and use the laminate if its reasonably priced. I might have to buy a decking board and plane it down to the right thickness because that is the main use of the wood.
    I need to do some sketches of the profile and thickness still, i need dimensions of the truss rod too.
    You're right about the weight thing too, all the woods are pretty dense:
    Bubinga 800 to 950 kg/m3,
    Cocobolo 1000 to 1100 kg/m3
    wenge 910 kg/m3
    Bulletwood 1060 kg/m3.

    Thankyou for your replies guys, it means a lot :smug:
     
  14. Phil Jolly

    Phil Jolly

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2012
    Location:
    Manchester, UK.
    That SR neck looks great, and David, lovely work. What's it like to work with? Also where would be the best place to buy it? Cheers
     
  15. David Pinton

    David Pinton

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Location:
    Normandie, France
    Disclosures:
    Builder DPinton Guitars and Basses
    Sorry to reply so late...
    I bought it as decking boards.
    It's a bit hard to work with : it dulls the power tools and is prone to tear out with hand tools. The curly pieces are especially difficult to plane without taking chips out, evenmoreso on a quartersawn surface. The dust is a bit irritating too.
    It sand very well and polishes nicely.
    In my limited experience it is almost impossible to bend (headstock back laminate over a volute was a real pain).
     

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