My new friend Herold...

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by InQuiet, Apr 3, 2014.


  1. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Here's some pics. of a 1932 build Herold Jaeger. I bought it off a sweet 92 year old woman who's had it in her possession for the last 50 years. I purchased it without much regard for inflation:cool:I've been on the lookout for such a bass such for the last couple years. My other bass is a Shen SB80, it was nice as a starter bass, and pizz., but didn't offer much when bowed. I don't have too much information on the maker, the labels says Strad. copy and has Czechoslovakia written on it. Others have stated they are usually roundbacks, the outer linings aren't atypical typical for German basses from what I've read. The bass needs setting up of course, the bridge feet appear to only be making about 60-70% contact with the top. Overall, the condition seems pretty good, considering. There's a crack that runs from the bottom of the lower bout up toward the bridge, it appears to either have been repaired or at least hasn't opened up much. I haven't used a mirror to look inside yet.
    Herold had some funky white Nylon strings for the D and G. not sure of the material, appears to be nylon with an outer steel winding??The strings appear to be almost as old as the bass. I transferred my Spirocore weichs on it, and was in shock when I bowed it.:hyper: coming from bowing an SB80 with Spiros, you can imagine. pizz sound is round and even up and down the neck, I can only imagine what a good setup will bring. Anyway, I'm extremely happy with my find. Anyone that has anything to add with regard to more info. on these basses please let me know.

    Attached Files:

  2. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    more photos of 1932 Jaeger

    Attached Files:

  3. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago
    loosen the strings a little and push the bridge top down towards the tailpiece (just a bit should do) until the feet are planted solidly. That's an unusual strip running down the back center seam...
  4. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Hey Eric, the photo is a little deceiving. The bridge appears to be slanted, but in actuality part of the unseen backside of the bridge is actually making contact. I might try your suggestion anyway just to see if more contact is made for a temporary fix.Thanks
  5. KUNGfuSHERIFF

    KUNGfuSHERIFF

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Nice bass! Here's an old thread with some (conflicting) information on Jaegers:

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f1/info-bass-maker-wanted-65827/

    I've seen "repairs" like that before. It's a half-ass way to correct a back center seam separation.

    For the record, the strings in your photos appear to be LaBella Supernils, which are nylon strings made to play and sound similar to gut.
  6. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    yeah, I thought they were gut like strings. With regard to the strips of wood on the back, are those referred to as "outer linings"? I read that they were somewhat common on older German basses?
    Thanks
  7. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago
    Those outer linings are on the ribs under the plates. Like your bass and this bass http://www.lemurmusic.com/ShowAdditionalImg.asp?number=BASTOCK277
  8. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Well, that's a little dissapointing about the back braces. Could/should these be removed and a proper repair made if desired? I'm learning here.
    Thanks
  9. KUNGfuSHERIFF

    KUNGfuSHERIFF

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    That's a major repair, with a major price tag. You may wish to consider the money you have in the bass plus the thousands the repairs would cost versus market value of $7K or so.
  10. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Right, I wonder how much these braces reduces this assumed market value of $7000?

  11. james condino

    james condino Spruce dork Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Location:
    asheville, nc
    Supernils and guts have nothing in common. Real gut gives you a bass experience like nothing else. Supernils are low tension cheap plastic crap; 'might as well have a Chinese label on them and be sold at Walmart...

    I've got a similar year Jaeger on my wokbench as we speak....oddly enough, having the center seam on the back enlarged and all of the back braces being replaced...

    They can be very nice basses when working well. 'Sounds like you got a great price! Good luck.

    j.
  12. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    That's a coincidence.

  13. KUNGfuSHERIFF

    KUNGfuSHERIFF

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    No coincidence. Flat backs shrink.

    And I said 'nils were made to play and sound like gut...not that they succeeded.
  14. InQuiet

    InQuiet Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    The coincidence was that he had a Jaeger on his bench, it seems there not that common. (?)
  15. Eric Hochberg

    Eric Hochberg

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Location:
    Chicago
    If you are going to play and enjoy the bass and it is performing well, and they don't bother you, I wouldn't give a second thought to the braces. If you wanted to sell it, and are competing with other basses for sale, the braces are not something that is desirable. But, if your bass is the best sounding in a bunch to a potential buyer, they may not be a deal breaker, especially if the bass can be repaired within a value a buyer assigns to it.

    Market value depends on many things…the sound, the condition, the size, knowledge, and affluence of the local market, etc. The $7k estimate doesn't really take into consideration the above parameters. A killer sounding Jaeger in good shape in a market like Chicago could fetch well over $7k. But, if your bass does need a back restoration, it would be worth much less without the repair, IMO.

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