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Newb has problems with skyline neck

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by jaysz, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. jaysz

    jaysz

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    Ok I am a sax player music major who is taking bass lessons at college
    for one of my secondary lessons. So I have played a bit of guitar before but never really more than a smattering of upright bass.

    On the advice of another music major who plays bass primarily I bought the Lakland Skyline DJ 4 string, and I love the fit and finish and the quality of the instrument. However I am finding the neck a bit too large for my small hands, I'm a male but I have hands that are about the average woman's hand size.

    I played another player at school's Tobias bass and I felt the neck was a lot easier to play, not sure which model, also he has flat wound strings on his bass and mine has nickle wounds I think, hard on my fingers.


    So I would like to know does Lakland make a bass in the skyline series 4 string that would have a more narrow profile neck, thanks for any and all help. Jay.
  2. seedokebass

    seedokebass Supporting Member

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    Have you tried the 44-60's? Basically a traditional Jazz bass. Should be a little thinner neck, but I haven't played a DJ4 yet.
  3. charismaticdog

    charismaticdog

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    Counter-intuitively I have found the wide nut, but slim front-back profile of Lakland's PBass clone to be very easy on my hands and wrists.
  4. zhollywood

    zhollywood Supporting Member

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    Do you mean nut width or the front to back profile?
    If so, My 2012 Lakland DJ4 has one of the thinnest profiles, front to back, that I have ever played.
    FYI I have very small hands for a bass player.
  5. jaysz

    jaysz

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    Ok after doing some practice on the bass, it seems to me the profile is fine
    my Taylor has a wider profile I believe, it is the width of the neck parallel to the frets, that is giving me problems.

    Any suggestions for another bass with a thinner neck in relation to the above, I am really only interested in good quality gear so please keep that in mind. Thanks a bunch. Jay.
  6. basspraiser

    basspraiser Jammin for the Lamb! Supporting Member

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    Try a lakland 4460....the neck profile nay be closer to what you prefer.

    Another option may be the new lakland short scale hollow body....

    The basses with the narrowest necks I have ever played are Fender Markus Miller and Gerry Lee basses....I cannot even play them!
  7. Snarf

    Snarf Supporting Member

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    With regard to strings, rounds are actually easier to play in general than flats. Rounds have less surface area in contact with the fingers. Flats can drag, and often have higher tension than rounds.
  8. mrb327

    mrb327 Just say No to Tort Supporting Member

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    ghs pressure wounds, easy on fingers, growl like a round
  9. JLY

    JLY Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Skyline Duck Dunn may be your answer
    Small narrow neck, very light weight also
    It is nicer than any non Pre-CBS Fender I have ever owned or played
  10. EagleMoon

    EagleMoon Supporting Member

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    I had a DJ a while back and the neck thickness is the main reason I sold it. Was just too round for me. I agree that a regular jazz neck would probably be more comfortable for you.
  11. chris_b

    chris_b

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    You've played double bass and you find a Lakland neck too big??

    IME, hand size isn't important, look at Esperanza Spalding, if you have a good technique.
  12. jaysz

    jaysz

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    Uhh I have played very little upright bass, Esperanza has a specially made bass that is very small in size, however that isn't the point.

    The point is I'm having trouble with the size of the bass on this neck, and I have given it some time and practiced with it as it is all I currently have. Thanks for all the help thus far, please keep the recommendations coming.
  13. Gabriel51

    Gabriel51 Supporting Member

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    The Tobias neck is asymmetrical, I owned a 5502 not long ago and cant remember the neck profile on it.
    I own two Tobias basses and the necks are very nice.
    Other basses that have smaller necks will most likely have narrow string spacing such as Ibanez but MusicMan and Spector have 17mm spacing which is about 2mm closer than what your Tobias has. the Spector is 35" scale in a 5 string the MM is 34".
  14. bassgod0dmw

    bassgod0dmw Supporting Member

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    So you're talking about the width of the fretboard? If so, a J bass (like yours) is about as small as they come.

    This will help a lot...
    A/B = Fretboard width
    C/D = Neck thickness
    [​IMG]
  15. jaysz

    jaysz

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    Yeah it is surely A-B that is the problem to my knowledge, but after some careful scrutinizing of lakland basses I realize the neck is thicker on this bass. It has 5 mounting screws on the back of the neck, the 44-60 has 4 and you can just tell the neck is thinner a to b wise, in the pictures of the same basses side by side.

    Gonna head to Smash (sam ash) and guitar center today to try out some Bass' and see whats I like :).
  16. bassgod0dmw

    bassgod0dmw Supporting Member

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    The DJ4 goes from 1.5" at the nut to 2.5" at the end of the fretboard. The 44-60 goes from 1.5" to 2.48" according to Lakland.
  17. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    That hasn't been my experience. Flatwounds' smoother surface makes my fingers slide more easily over them. While you are correct that your fingers have more surface area in contact with the string, I believe that the coefficient of friction is sufficiently lower on the flats that it overcomes the surface area issue. Try sliding your finger over some 80 grit sandpaper, then try 600 grit.
  18. Grissle

    Grissle Supporting Member

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    My basses have 1.43" - 1.45" nuts and they're much easier for me especially on open string fills and reaching the E string up higher on the neck. It's all relative, I bet some people with large hands would find my setup almost in-playable. I believe Sadowsky also offers an 1.45" nut option but they are a bit pricey but pretty solid investments.
  19. Gabriel51

    Gabriel51 Supporting Member

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    This concept is exactly backwards (no offense). It's the clean sneaker sole on a gym floor that sprains an ankle.
    It's the surface area that determines the friction for a given pressure otherwise things like disk brake rotors would work better with groves.

    It was one of the first things I noticed when I quit playing flats in the early 80's, rounds hurt my fingers at first but they were so much easier to slide on than flats. (anyone remember finger ease? Never need it with rounds)
  20. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Nope. The resistance to sliding is the coefficient of friction times the normal pressure times the area of contact. The windings of the roundwounds creates a very rough surface against which to slide. That's why your fingers will burn on a long glissando on roundwounds and not on flats. I'm saying that the effect of the reduced surface area of the rounds is surpassed by the flats' lower coefficient of friction.

    The only people I've ever seen using Finger Ease are guitarists playing roundwounds.

    It's analogous to the difference in shear strength of different soil types. Clay has a much lower shear resistance than sand because the particle size is much smaller and the coefficient of friction is resultantly lower. (BTW, the results of the tests used to measure the shear strength are presented as the arctangent of the coefficient of friction, and called the phi angle.)

    They do put grooves in high-performance brake discs. Holes, too.

    [​IMG]

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