Nitro neck care

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Not yet, Feb 17, 2014.


  1. Not yet

    Not yet

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    What's the proper way to care for a Nitro neck? First one

    Thanks
  2. Rocky McDougall

    Rocky McDougall

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Location:
    San Antonio, Texas
    What type of bass? What type of wood? What type of fretboard? What type of finishes?

    Very, very few fretboards are finished in Nitro lacquer.
  3. LowEndWooly

    LowEndWooly Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Location:
    Indiana is home
    I'm having a nitro neck made by warmoth (3a birdseye all the way) and I was wondering the same thing. Its on P Bass body with a Stingray pup.
  4. aphexafx

    aphexafx A mind is a terrible thing. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2013
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    I'm curious too. I might have a nitro Fender reissue neck headed my way.
  5. Rocky McDougall

    Rocky McDougall

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Location:
    San Antonio, Texas
    Nitro lacquer is not a tough finish and is not suited for a fretboard. Light colored wood such as Maple will soon become discolored because the finish wears of quickly. The fretboard should be finished in a clear poly and the rest of the neck can be Nitro.
  6. Not yet

    Not yet

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Rosewood fretboard, back of neck basically unfinished... It's a Nash
  7. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    Just make sure that any guitar stands or wall hangers are nitro safe. Out gassing foam can damage the finish. Also, try to avoid taking it from a cold environment to a hot one, so the finish doesn't crack.
  8. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx

    Every maple fretboard on a nitro finished neck is finished in nitro.
  9. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    1. Wipe it off after playing.
    2. Avoid contact with reactive materials i.e. plastics, latex, some other synthetics.
    3. If leaving on a stand, use a cloth or fur buffer at the contact points.
    4. Shift it in the stand every day or two to be sure.
    5. Better yet, play it every day.

    The choice to wax or not wax is yours. If you like the feel, go for it. If not, don't.
  10. Not yet

    Not yet

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Thanks. Any oils or other care recommended?
  11. CapnSev

    CapnSev Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    Location:
    Coeur d'Alene
    Let it get nasty. That's why you get a nitro finish.
  12. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Nitro is a complete finish. Oils (BLO, tung, mineral aka "lemon" etc) are finishes. There is no reason to combine finishes.
  13. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    NO OILS. All the can do is darken the wood, and they are never necessary.
  14. Not yet

    Not yet

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    Thanks for reply... So for the neck, just wipe off after gigs, that it? Body don't care, but need neck to stay fast
  15. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Location:
    Southern California
    Nitro looks great and ages well (meaning it wears out fast but in a cool way) BUT it feels crappy on the back of a neck and has a tendency to feel sticky. Gibson guitar polish is the best I've found to bring back a slick feeling to glossy nitro but you have to use it quite frequently. Personally, I prefer to sand the back of glossy necks to a smooth satin.
  16. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Location:
    Houston Tx
    You are over thinking this. Nitro is a hard shell finish and doesn't really require any special care. Just use common sense, and don't bang it around. If it gets dirty clean it with a damp cloth. You don't need any special polishes or oils.
  17. ou812

    ou812

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    So, in response to the idea of sanding down the gloss nitro neck to satin, what grit? Sandpaer or fine steel wool? Mine's a '13 gibson TBird. The gloss is pretty but has a certain stickiness to it even when clean. But I notice after an hour of playing I get gummy sections, almost like a reaction with my skin oils. Seems like it occurs mostly along the joint between the neck and rosewood fingerboard. Is that a real thing, and will a satin finish help?
  18. jeffbonny

    jeffbonny _____________ Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2000
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    De-glossed nitro finishes tend to gloss back up with playing. On my '57 RI P-bass I knocked down the gloss a couple of times with 000 steel wool but eventually stripped the finish off completely and oiled the neck.
  19. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Location:
    Southern California
    Some painters tape and a gray scotch-brite pad is the easiest and fastest way to knock the gloss off. Steel wool and 400+ grit sandpaper are too fine for this particular job and the neck will quickly burnish back into a gloss finish.

    Here's a video:
  20. bassgod0dmw

    bassgod0dmw Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2007
    Location:
    White Plains
    I've always used #0000 steel wool to de-gloss a neck. It works great. Just make sure you put tape over anything magnetic of you'll have little metal shavings stuck to it.

    Next time I plan on trying a scotch brite pad.

Share This Page