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Oak bass neck.

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Ronbeast, Dec 26, 2008.


  1. Ronbeast

    Ronbeast

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2008
    Location:
    Placentia,Newfoundland,Canada
    Can I build the neck for a bass out of Oak?I plan on starting a build in a few weeks and I have woods like oak,cherry and maple.I don't really want another maple neck because all of my basses and guitars are maple necked.Is oak able to be used as a neck wood?I heard somewhere that is splits very easily,so I'm hoping someone here will prove me wrong:p,thanks for any input and suggestions and if it comes down to it I may go with a maple neck anyways...:rolleyes:.

    -Ron
     
  2. wilser

    wilser

    Joined:
    May 4, 2004
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    yes, it would end up being very similar to ash bass necks as used by fodera and mtd. I've built a couple of ash necks and they are superb.
     
  3. scottyd

    scottyd

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Location:
    Waco Tx
    Disclosures:
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses
    Go for it, oak is a good, strong, stable, solid wood. It's a bit heavy but no more than say bubinga or wenge. It's been done before with success, there's really no good reason why it's not used more often.
     
  4. sargebaker

    sargebaker

    Joined:
    May 2, 2004
    Location:
    Montreal QC CA
    Disclosures:
    owner/builder, ISLAND Instrument Mfg.
    Our first few generations of guitars all had oak necks, and to the best of my knowledge, they've held up!
     
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  6. Ronbeast

    Ronbeast

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2008
    Location:
    Placentia,Newfoundland,Canada
    Thanks guys,thats all I needed to hear.And now I'm off to get the wood from my uncle,I should be starting a thread on my build in a few weeks if the wood is fairly decent.

    -Ron
     
  7. Woodpecker

    Woodpecker

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2007
    Location:
    "Newland", Finland
    Keep in mind when using oak that it contains resins that MAY cause the glueseam to turn green. Do a test on some scrap just to be shure. And some people are known to get allergic reactions to oak sawdust...
    Oh yeah, good luck btw :)
     
  8. Mikey R

    Mikey R

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Location:
    North Yorkshire, UK
    Also, Ive read that all oaks react with iron and steel, so you may need to be careful what you screw into it:

    http://www.john-boddy-timber.ltd.uk/Pics/glossary_pages/oak_euro_clearquartered_c.html

    EDIt: bear in mind that the info on the JBT site sometimes doesnt tally with other peoples experience, but on thw whole it tends to be accurate especially for British species.
     
  9. cricketfever32

    cricketfever32

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Location:
    North Brunswick NJ
    that'd be pretty cool to rub iron filings into the oak so it turns blue
     
  10. vbasscustom

    vbasscustom

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2008
    yeah, and it stinks like crap when you cut it, or at least when i cut it does:meh:
     
  11. sargebaker

    sargebaker

    Joined:
    May 2, 2004
    Location:
    Montreal QC CA
    Disclosures:
    owner/builder, ISLAND Instrument Mfg.
    yup :)
     
  12. Mikey R

    Mikey R

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Location:
    North Yorkshire, UK
    So does ash ;)
     
  13. pin_head_47

    pin_head_47

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2001
    Location:
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Is oak not used very often for a reason? I've heard from a few people on here that it doesn't resonate very well, or is kind of 'dead' sounding, but I could be wrong.
     
  14. joeyl

    joeyl Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA /El Paso TX
    oh no :rollno:
     
  15. pin_head_47

    pin_head_47

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    Jan 5, 2001
    Location:
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Hey, I'm not trying to start anything, just asking... maybe it's just because that it's heavy, maybe it's nothing to do with the sound, again, I'm just asking because of stuff I've heard elsewhere... if it's not the case, please, feel free to fill me in. I'm by no means an expert here. :)
     
  16. Son of Magni

    Son of Magni

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    May 10, 2005
    Location:
    NH
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    Builder: ThorBass
    I would think oak would not only be great for tone but would also make a very nice feeling neck with an oil finish.
     
  17. sargebaker

    sargebaker

    Joined:
    May 2, 2004
    Location:
    Montreal QC CA
    Disclosures:
    owner/builder, ISLAND Instrument Mfg.
    :( that makes me less looking forward to working with ash.

    Merry 09 Everyone
     
  18. scottyd

    scottyd

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Location:
    Waco Tx
    Disclosures:
    Builder/owner Redeemer Basses
    That's a great question and I for one wish I had a solid answer. I can tell you my opinion though. Honestly I don't think it's been used enough to give the best answer on how it sounds. I think the biggest reason it’s not used is because years ago acoustic instrument builders tried it and it did not work well in their application. You see that’s where this whole "tone wood" thing originates, and it's amplified by marketing nonsense. A solid body instruments sound comes mostly from the electronic system. This is what it relies on to make useful noise. Electric guitars simply don’t require the same wood properties as acoustic ones, so why should the same rules apply? Again this is just my opinion, many will disagree but I firmly believe It boils down to three things tradition, marketability and looks.

    Not one to stick with tradition, marketability and looks, when I do use oak in a neck I’ll use this,

    [​IMG]

    It’s quarter sawn white oak, the large fleck in the grain is pretty common in white oak when Q.S I think this looks nice. On the Janka scale, white oak has a hardness rating of 1360 this is harder than white ash, Honduran mahogany and black walnut it’s almost there with hard maple which scores a 1450. This tells me that it is structurally sound for neck use and as with most Q.S. woods it should be very stable. :D
     
  19. pin_head_47

    pin_head_47

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2001
    Location:
    Sioux Falls, SD
    That sounds like some good info, and that's some really good looking grain there too. I think the "sound" of a wood has more to do with not just the species of wood, but the quality of that particular slab or piece of wood. If it's not seasoned, dried and well prepared, then it don't matter how good of a "tonewood" it's supposed to be.
     
  20. joeyl

    joeyl Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA /El Paso TX
    I agree totally, the only useful info on woods used in solidbody electrics to me would be how hard the wood is, how the grain looks and feels, and what kind of finish it would take to make it look good. Tonewood specs should be reserved for tops of acoustic instruments, where the vibrating wood is making the most of the sound
     
  21. jordan_frerichs

    jordan_frerichs

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Location:
    Nebraska
    i like it. it smells like you walked into a garden and plant store that also sells fish or something so that it is humid. (like most eral may stores). bloodwood is the best smelling that i have worked with so far. smells almost chocolatey
     

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