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Opinions on Warwick PS Corvette Std 5 Ash Fretless

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by ecmjazz, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. ecmjazz

    ecmjazz

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    Hello,

    I am considering buying this bass:

    http://www.thomann.de/gb/warwick_ps_corvette_std_5_ash_fl_honey.htm (Warwick PS Corvette Std 5 Ash FL Honey)

    By comparing the price with the prices on the Warwick's site, I guess this one should be built in Korea, since the German ones seem to be all 3000+ EUR?

    I need a 5-string fretless bass which would give me the most natural woody-tone, as much closer to a double bass, as possible (I would like to achieve Eberhard Weber's type of sound). I prefer wooden-style body with black fretboard, so this one is very close to my taste except that the hardware is not black, but I could live with it as it is. The questions are - is the Ash wood close to what I need, and should I look for Bubinga instead? Moreover, should I look for a $$ version, or the standard, active one would give me enough to gain that natural sound? Furthermore, I've played so far a 4-string fretless with all fretmarks on the fretboard, and although not having any fretmark on the fretboard is sexier, are there any marks at least on the top of the neck, and would they be enough, having in mind I am not really a pro, and don't have much experience? I guess this one would support a high C-string instead of low B-string, since I would like to get in the higher registers..? And last - I am planning to try some e-bow in the future - actually I am not sure whether there exist e-bows for basses, but if there are some available, would this type of bass be appropriate for usage with e-bow, or should I look into another one?

    Please, take into account that the given price drop seems quite of a bargain, so maybe I could really sacrifice some of the requirements - it would be all a trade-off between price and performance..
  2. ecmjazz

    ecmjazz

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    Anyone on this topic, please!?
  3. Webtroll

    Webtroll Rolling for initiative Supporting Member

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    I love the sound of Warwick fretless basses with the MEC JJ pickups, if you're wanting a good fretless you'd be hard pressed to get a better tone.
  4. LakeEffect

    LakeEffect Supporting Member

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    I can't speak on the pro series vette, but I had a pro series thumb. Very impressed with the quality, it was a fantastic instrument, sounded just like its german counterpart (other bolt-on's, at least). I think the pro series are an awesome way to save a buck and have no reservations about telling you to go for it if you like the model.
  5. Turxile

    Turxile

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    I sting my Warwick Dolphin with E-C with Chromes, 100-75-55-40-32. It works, no issues.
    For the upright sound, it's in your set-up and how you play more than the bass. Raise the string action sky high for better results, and pluck the strings like an upright; pull and release.
    Ash should work, my ash corvette has a big and full sound with good attack. Mine is J/MM config though so won't directly compare to your pickup options.
    For an upright sound you'll find strings make more of a difference than electronics though. You should experiment with various flats and tapes.

    Here's an alternative; If you're after the EUB sound, why not get an EUB?
  6. ecmjazz

    ecmjazz

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    I expected that question about the EUB:D Well the reason is that I suspect it would take quite a long time to switch to the upright playing left-hand techique, which time I don't have currently. And moreover I still believe it is quite achievable to do it with a bass guitar - your hints are actually kind of a proof for it. For a long time I left behind the tirando tecnhique and am playing mainly apoyando as do the upright players, and also I play quite close to the neck again as they do it on the upright, so the sound is quite close even on my crappy no-name 4-string fretless. But the sound is the one I like only when unplugged. When I plug it, the P-style pickup throws much more of a P-style sound. When playing only with the J-style, it is closer to what I want bit still not the same. So that's why I was thinking that the wood and pickups still might have some role although not the main one. Anyway I should try also your advice about the high action, and different string types. By the way I was thinking also about some Yamaha 5-string fretless from the TRB series, as they have all fret-marks on the fretboard, but they seem to be discontinued now. Do they have some replacement model for the 1005F, or they totally discarded it?
  7. Turxile

    Turxile

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    When I try to go for that sound I raise my action to 4mm E to 3mm G. With flats, it takes time to get used to, but works. You can also stick a sponge under the strings at the bridge, controls the sustain a bit.

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