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parallel mic connections

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by violettj, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. violettj

    violettj

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    Hi all,

    My small church has about 8 mic connections from the stage back to the sound board in the back of the house (plus two keyboard connection, mic for piano, direct for KORG M1). total of 10.

    The non fixed connections are 4 on one side of the stage, 4 the other, and 1 in the middle.

    While I don't think there would be an issue, but is it possible to wire the mic connections in parallel and have 8 on both sides but only use one side at a time? So mic inputs 6-12 would be accessible from either side of the stage.

    The only drawback I would see is possible electrical noise. And the logistics of someone unintentionally using the same input on both sides of the stage (one a mic and the other a DI instrument.) at the same time.

    John
  2. Joe Louvar

    Joe Louvar

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    Hi John

    I wish I could help you, but to be honest I don't understand what your trying to ask with your question? What mixing board do you have?
  3. line6man

    line6man

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    If you put two microphones in parallel, you are going to cause a significant change in signal impedance. Bad idea.
  4. violettj

    violettj

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    We have a 24 chan sound craft.

    I guess I wondering if you can split a balanced input to come from two different sources.
  5. kedo

    kedo

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    It sounds like you need to have matching input/output boxes at each side of stage wired to a patch bay at FOH mix position.
  6. violettj

    violettj

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    Yeah I know bad idea about two mics in parallel. The intent is for only one mic to be plugged in at a time. I know just use a longer cable to the single input right. But that gets messy.
  7. violettj

    violettj

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    How does a patch bay work?
  8. bkbirge

    bkbirge Supporting Member

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    Disclosures:
    Endorsing Artist: Steak n Shake
    You can do that no problem, as long as you only use one side at a time as you indicated was the plan. You won't really hurt anything if you ignore that but you probably won't sound all that great either.
  9. Joe Louvar

    Joe Louvar

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    I'm not sure I'd recommend it, but "yes" you can - checkout mic splitters.
  10. kedo

    kedo

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    So, lets say that you have input/output boxes (soundboxes) with 8 mic inputs and 4 mic outputs on each side of the stage. Call them 1 and 2. You would wire these boxes to the patchbay. A patchbay is basically just a 3 rack space box that has 48 1/4" female connectors in it. Inputs 1-8 from soundbox 1 could hit patchpoints 1-8. Inputs 1-8 from soundbox 2 would hit patchpoints 9-16. Outputs to stage could hit 17-21 and so on...

    The outputs/inputs from/to the desk would also hit a patchbay. I prefer for that to be another patchbay unit, just to avoid confusion. So, Soundcraft inputs 1-24 would hit patchpoints 1-24 (on the 2nd unit. Call it bay 2, and the other bay 1). Outputs from the soundcraft would hit patchpoints 25-48, or however many you need.

    Using short patch cables, you can patch between points (point A being the desk, point B being the stage...)

    This allows you to take/send signal from/to wherever you need, and you can "roll with the flow" and change the point from which signal originates, and you can change where you're sending it on the fly.

    good luck!
  11. violettj

    violettj

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    Oh so a patch bay works like the old telephone switch boards... One ringy dingy...
  12. kedo

    kedo

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    That's exactly right.
  13. TimmyP

    TimmyP

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    Should be fine. If there's any noise (doubtful), terminate the unused input with an XLR plug that has a resistor between pins 2 and 3. The lower the better, until it's so low that it effects the sound quality of the mic in use. I'd try 1K to start.
  14. Keithwah

    Keithwah Supporting Member

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    I design AV systems for the traditional worship market, and we see this done often enough. You should have no issue with the jacks paralleled as long as, and you point it out yourself, you only use one channel at a time. The secret to having a noise free paralleled line is to make sure you don't run your wire up and over since this often times creates an antenna for FM radio. We always run cable under and back up, or surface run it at ground level using a plastic wire mold raceway.

    Most churches don't have people I place that are smart enough to figure out that if there are two mic jacks for each, and that they can only use one or the other. You cannot leave things plugged into both channel jacks at the same time even if you are only using one actively.

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