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Passive tone stack

Discussion in 'Amps [BG]' started by PBFACTOR, Feb 12, 2014.

  1. PBFACTOR

    PBFACTOR Supporting Member

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    A passive tone stack on an amp would mean cut only, correct?
  2. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Don't just TalkBass - PlayBass! Supporting Member

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    Google Fender tone stack, you will find lots of useful info.
  3. VerryBerry

    VerryBerry Supporting Member

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    That is correct.

    From the Traynor YBA-200 Manual:

    "Tech Note: The YBA200 has been fitted with a traditional passive tone stack. This allows the
    tubes to generate natural sounding harmonics when driven into saturation. Active tone controls
    can generate unwanted harmonics when clipping interrupts the feedback loop in the amplifier.
    Passive tone controls are always subtractive, which means they can only reduce the gain in
    their specific frequency ranges. Active tone controls, on the other-hand, are wrapped around
    an amplifier and will provide gain boost when the controls are turned past the middle position."

    As it was explained in a post I cannot now find, you start by turning up all the EQ controls to max. At this point you are not attenuating the signal. Then, you subtract what frequencies you don't want by turning down the appropriate control.
  4. Sid Fang

    Sid Fang Reformed Fusion Player Supporting Member

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    In general practice, yes. It's possible to build a passive cut/boost tone control circuit, but it's complicated and AFIK rarely done.
  5. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Don't just TalkBass - PlayBass! Supporting Member

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    Actually the "flat" setting of a typical Fender passive tone stack is approximately 2-10-2 if the knobs are marked 1 through 10, or around 8:00/5:00/8:00.
  6. PBFACTOR

    PBFACTOR Supporting Member

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  7. wcriley

    wcriley

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    Disclosures:
    Uncompensated endorsing user: fEARful
    The Fender stack can boost highs and lows, so is it truly passive?
  8. coreyfyfe

    coreyfyfe Supporting Member

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    The boost is relative to the insertion loss of the tone stack. I think.
  9. beans-on-toast

    beans-on-toast

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    If you didn't have loss when the tone circuit is put in the signal pathway, a boost would run out of headroom.
  10. wcriley

    wcriley

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    I think I'm starting to understand.

    The bass and treble controls cause less insertion loss as they're turned up. Which then appears as a "boost" after the make up gain stage that follows.
  11. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Don't just TalkBass - PlayBass! Supporting Member

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    Correct, it is all related to make up gain.

    Here is the big cheese in the passive EQ world. :bassist:
  12. Rob22315

    Rob22315

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    With a few exceptions, passive circuits don't boost. Boosting requires active.
  13. kbakerde

    kbakerde Supporting Member

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    I don't care if it's active or passive, but IMO the Fender Tone Stack is the foshizzle!! It is exactly what I want out of a bass sound.
  14. Passinwind

    Passinwind Charlie Escher Supporting Member

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    Not necessarily -- it's kind of a semantics thing. When you look at the whole picture of how an amp works, not just the tone stack by itself, you'll see that boost/cut EQ is readily done using a passive stack. IMHO this thread is the go-to starting point for understanding bass amp EQ: http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f15/some-discussion-amp-eqs-950782/

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