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Perfect P/J?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by TrevorOfDoom, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. TrevorOfDoom

    TrevorOfDoom Supporting Member

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but a P pup is wired in parallel, and J pups are wired in series. So if one created a PJ and put a phase switch (a la S-1 series) on the P pup only, one could resonably recreate an accurate J sound with the P pup in series with the J at the bridge, yes?
  2. Systolic

    Systolic

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    bump for me being interested in this as well
  3. uOpt

    uOpt Supporting Member

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    No, the mix is (P in series) x in parallel with (Jazz).

    Since each P coil is only half a pickup you must keep it in series inside the P.
  4. dedpool1052

    dedpool1052

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    on the fenders with the S1 switch, the standard p was switch from series to parallel and the jazz switch from parallel to series. the tonal effect on the p was less than stellar. it sucked out the low-mids and the volume dropped considerably. on the other hand, the j with the S1 switch was great. you had you standard jazz sound, and when put in series, you got the extra low-mids and volume you get from a p, with more articulation due to pickup placement. to answer your question, no, i dont think it would give an accurate j-bass tone. personally, the real "best-of-both-worlds" is a jazz bass with a series/parallel switch.
  5. lowendmafia

    lowendmafia Supporting Member

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    I had a P pickup wound non RW/RP so it would run in phase with a j pickup. It sounds wonderful.
  6. TrevorOfDoom

    TrevorOfDoom Supporting Member

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    That's what I'm talking about!

    Buuuut... does it sound like a beefier Jazz?
  7. Broadstbully22

    Broadstbully22

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    Where, how much, everything. I'm very interested. I just bought this squire and I'm going to change the pups, bridge and tuners out. So this really interests me.
  8. lowendmafia

    lowendmafia Supporting Member

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    No, it definitely sounds like a P. Sounds very similar to a standard P pickup I have of the same type. However the PJ is in a J body so it's a bit different position. I play it as "just a P" all the time.

    Not sure how much as they were ordered in a custom build from Bluesman Vintage. The pickups are David Allen. He has a website and is a cool guy to deal with plus he makes killer pickups.
  9. Bassamatic

    Bassamatic keepin' the beat since the 60's Supporting Member

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    So- wouldn't that just be a 2-piece jazz pickup in the P position?
  10. lowendmafia

    lowendmafia Supporting Member

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    I mean, I guess you can say that, but a P is only RW/RP so the pickup is hum canceling. The directions of the wind really doesn't affect the sound that much.
  11. Davo-London

    Davo-London

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    Ignorance is Strength

    Quote from 1984

    Do we have any circuit diagrams that would help? I'm a tad lost!

    Davo
  12. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    What is "RW/RP"?

    As an aside, the Perfect P/J, to me, is the G&L SB-2 with a Master Volume and Tone added...
  13. dedpool1052

    dedpool1052

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    IIRC, Reverse Wound/Reverse Polarity.
  14. uOpt

    uOpt Supporting Member

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    Excuse me but having one half of the P pickup reverse magnetic polarity isn't done for sound reasons. It is done so that you can have hum canceling when combining with a Jazz pickup. Of course now it hums when only the P is on, unless you go literally out of phase and cancel a good chunk of the A and D string's induction.

    With identical reverse polarity on both halves of the P pickups You can still combine the three coils any way you like in any combination of in-series or parallel, which then dictates how it sounds.
  15. spiritbass

    spiritbass Supporting Member

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    'Captain Obvious' chiming in. ;) I have never heard a split-P pickup that sounds like a jazz pickup. The precision pickup that most resembles a jazz pickup sound would be the single coil precision, but they still sound different to me. My "perfect P/J" is a Dingwall which allows series or parallel connection of the pickups (or solo either) through the four-position rotary selector switch:

    [​IMG]
  16. StuartV

    StuartV Out of GAS!! Supporting Member

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    So, why would you need to do this in a PJ? Why not just reverse the leads from the J pickup when wiring it into its pot?
  17. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

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    Normal split-coil P pickups have the coils wired in series, and RW/RP relative to each other to be hum-canceling. On P-basses, Fender's S-1 switch activated parallel wiring, which thinned out the sound, and moved it closer to J-bass territory. (I used to have one, and never used the S-1. Who wants to thin the tone of a P-bass?)

    J-bass pickups are normally wired in parallel relative to each other, and RW/RP relative to each other, which is why they are hum-canceling when both are at the same volume. On those, the S-1 allowed the pickups to be wired in series, which fattened the tone and boosted output, making them sound a little more like a P-bass.

    So, on a P/J, if you wired the split-coil in parallel, it should sound a little more like a J-bass with both pickups on, because the split-coil's tone will be thinned out. But, due to the split-coil's placement and different coil sizes, it still won't sound exactly like a J-bass. Also, unless you used a hum-canceling J pickup or had a NON RW/RP polarity split-coil with coils RW/RP relative to the J pickup (like lowendmafia), you'll have single coil hum with both pickups on.
  18. TrevorOfDoom

    TrevorOfDoom Supporting Member

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    That makes sense to me.
    I thought i was on to something with the Series/parallel thing, but there had to be a reason everybody wasn't doing it.
    Thanks!!

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